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The right way to advertise a job

I just noticed a job ad that came into my email and I it was rather astonishing.

I wanted to mention something about it because it was so unusual.

* The ad clearly describes what the job involves.
* It states where the company is located.
* The salary range offered is listed, and it is exactly what I know the competitive rate to be for the area for skilled personnel who have the described skills.
* It notes that full relocation is provided
* It notes that all interviewing expenses will be paid by the company
* The requirements are very clearly laid out in three lines. All of the requirements are things that are actually needed for the sort of job described and they are all related skills and it is reasonable to expect them in someone doing this sort of work. No specific vendor tools are mentioned at all here.

I mention this to you, because this is what I tell people is required if you want to find people and yet it has been decades since I last saw an ad like this.
Tony Chang
Thursday, June 26, 2008
 
 
"yet it has been decades since I last saw an ad like this. "

You don't get out much do you? ;)

My experience has been that larger companies tend to be straight up like this while smaller tend to play the various recruitment games.
~Eric
Thursday, June 26, 2008
 
 
~Eric, your experience is not representative of reality.
please don't delete
Thursday, June 26, 2008
 
 
"My experience has been that larger companies tend to be straight up like this while smaller tend to play the various recruitment games."

This is the exact opposite of my experience. Most of the large companies I have applied to, or known about open positions in, have gone the recruiter route or posted positions with the alphabet soup requirements. Small to medium size companies I have seen (I do not pay a lot of attention to job ads unless I am looking) take the more direct approach of, this is what we need and this is what we can offer. Posting the salary is the only exception in that most companies do not post the salary range. Again, this is my personal experience.
Anominal
Thursday, June 26, 2008
 
 
Tony

I am curious, as I think I got the same add. Was it something about 'software labs expanding...80 to 140K"?

Regards
Ari Telias Send private email
Thursday, June 26, 2008
 
 
I agree that bigger companies, in general, have worse ads.  Typically they have some boilerplate paragraphs that read like "our goal is to achieve synergy in the marketplace".  Part of this is probably because the hiring manager is not allowed to write the posting himself.

Of course, plenty of small companies have sucky ads to.  Look at almost any listing on Craigslist for proof.
Jason Send private email
Thursday, June 26, 2008
 
 
"~Eric, your experience is not representative of reality. "

So you're saying I'm not a real person?

"This is the exact opposite of my experience. Most of the large companies I have applied to, or known about open positions in, have gone the recruiter route or posted positions with the alphabet soup requirements."

Interesting... I define large as fortune-100 or bigger corporations.  All of the ones I consult for use a contract house with some classification like Rank or Grade which translates into a range on the pay scale.

Granted my, very real, experience -- been in this 15+ years with "large" companies and the smaller companies.  By small I will say the corporations doing 50M to 100M per year.

Interesting....
~Eric
Thursday, June 26, 2008
 
 
Did it state what company the position was for as well? I think that's pretty important, but almost always lacking.
Matt B Send private email
Thursday, June 26, 2008
 
 
Ari, Yes.
Tony Chang
Thursday, June 26, 2008
 
 
Eric, have you really seen an ad that specifically mentioned both full relocation and interviewing expenses would be covered, in addition to the other qualities?

It's rare enough to see a salary.
Tony Chang
Thursday, June 26, 2008
 
 
Matt B, it did not, but a description of the company's multiple office locations and market niche was presented of sufficient detail that it was possible to make a reasonable guess. Which is the case in any good ad, you have to say something about what they do. If the recruiter hides all the details there's not much point in responding because you don't have any idea what they're doing.
Tony Chang
Thursday, June 26, 2008
 
 
My company, Socialtext, is hiring developers who like LAMP / JavaScript and have perl or python chops.

All the developers work from home, except Gabe, and he just comes into the office 'cuz it's 3 miles from his house.

Join me, and together we can rule the galaxy as father and son.

No, wait, sorry.  Scratch that. Not Darth Vader; Steve Jobs -

You can keep writing your CRUD apps for an IT shop for the rest of your life, or you can join me and change the world.

--- that's more like it.

www.Socialtext.com
Matthew Heusser Send private email
Friday, June 27, 2008
 
 
I agree that I find it rather perturbing that so many job posts lack salary information.  I mean, companies wouldn't want you wasting their time if you applied without giving a resume, why do they expect me to come beating down their door without them giving me incentive that they're even paying a decent salary.

This is more problematic in smaller markets (where I am now) salaries vary wildly from insultingly low to acceptable rates.  At one shop I checked out, I quickly found out they were paying C++ devs with more than 10yrs exp a mere $40k and abysmal working conditions, they were an HVAC company and the office had no AC, just open windows and lots of fans!!!
TravisO Send private email
Friday, June 27, 2008
 
 
Heusser, thanks, that satire is a perfect example of the sort of really bad job ad that we see all the time nowadays.

TravisO, exactly.

95% of ads rule themselves out instantly with clueless or outlandish lists of acronyms and such. Lists of vendor tools or exact version numbers of some library are particularly retarded.

For those with reasonable requirements, the usual situation is no salary listed, no benefits listed, does not say relocation will be provided, does not say interview expenses will be paid. To top it off you will be told 'no phone calls' so you can't even clarify any of these issues before wasting your time sending in a resume that will be scanned into a computer by a secretary or document scanning service and then never read because of an acronym mismatch. Total waste of time for everyone, especially anyone with enough skills to find a job without having to deal with these clueless boxes of mystery.
Tony Chang
Friday, June 27, 2008
 
 
The issue is that most of the good positions filled by smart people are filled through a network. There seems to be a fundamental problem with a person's network if they have to blast e-mails out to people who they don't know, and who didn't ask to be e-mailed.
Ken Sharpe Send private email
Friday, June 27, 2008
 
 

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