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MX Record Change for Google Apps / Email

Ok, I'm pretty clueless when it comes to DNS, so I have a question for those who aren't...

I'm planning to switch my mail server to use the Google Apps mail server instead of the mail server that comes with my webhost.  In order to do that, Google says I need to change my MX Record to point to their server instead of my current mail server.  That makes sense.

I see the MX Record can be changed with my Domain Registrar (directnic.com), and I also see the MX Record settings in the Control Panel for my webhost (servergrid.com).

Here's the question: Should I change the MX record with the domain registrar, the webhost, or both?  Thanks if someone can help me understand  :)

Tuesday, February 26, 2008
 
 
Ok -

You have a domain record for yourdomain.com with directnic. That domain record will specify domain servers (primary and backup or secondary.)

Just look at the names in those entries. That will tell you (fairly directly) whose service is supplying the DNS service, which is what you need to tweak.

IE: if the domain servers are named something like ns1.directnic.com, then you need to make the control panel setting change in your Directnic DNS setup.

But if the domain server names have servergrid.com as part of their domain name, then it is actually Servergrid that is performing the DNS function.

It's possible that Servergrid supplies DNS service that you are not currently using (because your domain servers are pointed back to directnic.) In that event, changing the MX records on Servergrid will do nothing. It could also be the opposite case, too.

DNS is actually a service that is on top of domain registration. You could actually have up to three parties involved in web hosting: the web host, the DNS service, and the registrar.
Bored Bystander Send private email
Tuesday, February 26, 2008
 
 
Awesome explanation - thanks!

<<
DNS is actually a service that is on top of domain registration. You could actually have up to three parties involved in web hosting: the web host, the DNS service, and the registrar.
>>

That was the main part of my misunderstanding - I thought the domain registrar was necessarily the DNS Service.  Thanks for the clarification!

Tuesday, February 26, 2008
 
 
Glad it helped.

PS: generally, DNS service is provided by the web host as part of the hosting package. It is a relatively new thing that registrars like Godaddy bundle free DNS into their domain registration service. But I have no idea how you have things set up.

I use Google Apps for one spam clogged domain that I want to keep off of my main server. I recall that I needed to have the MX record for the domain changed at the moment that I activated the Google app's email service. But Google picked it right up. And my web site (A record) still points at my web server. It all works OK.
Bored Bystander Send private email
Tuesday, February 26, 2008
 
 

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