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Salary "commiserate" with experience

"The compensation is in the low to mid $80K area and is commiserate with experience."

Are recruiters even required to speak Emglish anymore?
Pat Buchanan
Wednesday, May 02, 2007
 
 
Whoever wrote that must be incontinent.
OneMist8k
Wednesday, May 02, 2007
 
 
commensurate, maybe? commiserate means to feel of express feelings on sympath for...

Or maybe they meant you'll have to find people to commiserate with you to make up the pay differential...:-)
anomalous
Wednesday, May 02, 2007
 
 
...feel or express...
anomalous
Wednesday, May 02, 2007
 
 
I'd think it's an honest typo, particularly if they simply ran it through the word processor's spell checker instead of looking it up in the dictionary.

It would be a rather amusing, unintended consequence.
TheDavid
Wednesday, May 02, 2007
 
 
"Are recruiters even required to speak Emglish anymore?"

You're not setting a good example yourself.
Fidelio
Wednesday, May 02, 2007
 
 
It was an ironic joke.
AllanL5
Wednesday, May 02, 2007
 
 
+1 for giving Fidelio clueless post of the day :)
TravisO Send private email
Wednesday, May 02, 2007
 
 
Nah, 'm' is a little too close to 'n' for me to consider that a joke (and it's certainly not ironic, but I won't go there ;)
Fidelio
Wednesday, May 02, 2007
 
 
Commiserate is a word in Emglish -- but I don't think it is in English.
Randy Magruder Send private email
Wednesday, May 02, 2007
 
 
I'm imagining the payslip piping up when you open it, with a little voice that commiserates you on it's shittyness.

In such an experienced way, that you can't help but accept it.
Matt Send private email
Wednesday, May 02, 2007
 
 
Beside the spelling mistake, what does this mean anyhow? "Low to mid $80k area" is pretty specific. So if you're fresh out of college you'll get $80k but if you're a 10 year veteran you'll get $86k?
Kaln
Wednesday, May 02, 2007
 
 
"So if you're fresh out of college you'll get $80k but if you're a 10 year veteran you'll get $86k?"

Basically a small company with no room for career growth.

Wednesday, May 02, 2007
 
 
Actually, it is a word in English:

http://www.answers.com/commiserate&r=67
Ben Atkin Send private email
Wednesday, May 02, 2007
 
 
>>Actually, it is a word in English:

>>http://www.answers.com/commiserate&r=67

Yes, but the linguists dont say so: http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind0606b&L=ads-l&P=9548
VR Send private email
Wednesday, May 02, 2007
 
 
I meant - "do not support such usage".
VR Send private email
Wednesday, May 02, 2007
 
 
Here's a similarly bad mistake: 'Principle Engineer'

http://jobs.joelonsoftware.com/default.asp?1775

Unless the position only to engineer concepts and ideas...
sgf
Wednesday, May 02, 2007
 
 
"commensurate, maybe? commiserate means to feel of express feelings on sympath for..."

That you Captain Obvious!
drox
Thursday, May 03, 2007
 
 
Speaking of spelling mistakes, I once had a boss that sent an email with a lot of people in CC (managers, etc.) that said something in the lines of:

"Your software is steel not working!"

English is not our native language but still this was highly amuzing! :D
Lisbon guy
Thursday, May 03, 2007
 
 
drox, the whole thing was in quotes, not just the 'commiserate' so the reader has two ways to intrepret the question...
anomalous
Thursday, May 03, 2007
 
 
I've made the same commiserate/commensurate mistake in conversation. They sound alot alike. Given the many non-verbal geeks in the industry, I'd think people on this board would be a bit more forgiving.
Damien Katz
Thursday, May 03, 2007
 
 
> Nah, 'm' is a little too close to 'n' for me to consider that a joke (and it's certainly not ironic, but I won't go there ;)

that is ironic, but only if it's NOT a joke.
Captain Nemo
Monday, May 07, 2007
 
 
Putting aside the incorrect word used, the employee should pay commensurate with achievement rather than with experience.
Craig Welch Send private email
Thursday, May 10, 2007
 
 

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