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5400rpm vs 7200rpm hard drive for new laptop

I try to decide between a 5400rpm vs 7200rpm hard drive for my new laptop. What are the opinions out there? Is the 7200rpm a noticeable improvement? What about the power consumption and long term reliability?
midtown programmer Send private email
Wednesday, November 22, 2006
 
 
I have usually been an advocate of 7200rpm disks in laptops.  However, my latest laptop (a Sony Vaio SZ) has a 5200rpm disk, and I'm quite happy with the performance.
Eric Sink Send private email
Wednesday, November 22, 2006
 
 
5400 will give you longer battery life, so I prefer the slower drives for portable use.

If you need the speed, as for video editing, then you'll want to think about using something other than a laptop, or using it with a raid connected via firewire.
Meghraj Reddy
Wednesday, November 22, 2006
 
 
5400 or 4800 is noticeably slower, especially when working on a laptop.  Go with the 7200 or faster, it'll be worth the extra money.

Another big thing that effects the speed is if the video is shared, even if you increase the ram to make up for, shared video will definitely slow you down if you plan on doing any game or video playing.
Zach M.
Wednesday, November 22, 2006
 
 
I think in the end you need to decide if you will be running on battery more or plugged in more.  If plugged in, get the more power happy hardware. 

You must also remember, your 7200rpm harddrive may run in a power saver mode with reduced speed when you are on  battery power, meaning the 7200rpm drive won't make a difference then.  (Note, this may or may not be the case depending on the laptop you buy.  Also, if the laptop you buy has this, you may or may not be able to enable or disable this option depending on the laptop you buy.)
I forgot my posting name.
Wednesday, November 22, 2006
 
 
"5400 or 4800 is noticeably slower, especially when working on a laptop."

Huh? You mean that 1 minute is longer or shorter for laptops?
Roman Werpachowski Send private email
Wednesday, November 22, 2006
 
 
I bought a 7200rpm drive for my Dell Inspiron 6100 last year and it certainly seems faster than any of my previous Notebooks, but so is the Notebook itself.

Most folks say hard drive performance really affects Notebooks, and that's been my experience. The disk light comes on and stays on and you just sit and wait for it to do its stuff. So yes go with 7200rpm.
Neville Franks Send private email
Wednesday, November 22, 2006
 
 
I would strongly recommend a 7200RPM drive.  The difference in battery life is negligible.  Take a look at Storage Review's power results:
http://www.storagereview.com/articles/200511/notebook_7.html

7200RPM drives drew 3 watts during seek, 0.69-0.94 when idle.

5400RPM drives best performances were 2.5 watts during seek, 0.47 watts when idle (Not the same drive).

Overall you're looking at a worst-case of a  half-watt difference overall.  A notebook computer will draw between 30 and 120 watts depending on the screen size and hardware, so in the end the cost is 1.667 to 0.042% of your battery life.
Jim B. Send private email
Wednesday, November 22, 2006
 
 
I can tell you that moving from 5400 to 7200 is quite noticeable in the desktop. Recently I moved a few VMs from a 20 Gb@5400 Samsung to a 200Gb@7200 hard drive and, though I did not time it I am sure they are much more responsive now. There may be other factors involved too like faster seek times, etc so take this with a pinch of salt.
JSD Send private email
Wednesday, November 22, 2006
 
 
"I can tell you that moving from 5400 to 7200 is quite noticeable in the desktop."

Ceteris paribus, there is no difference in the performance increase between a desktop and a latop. Suggesting otherwise (as Zach M. did above) is plain silly.
Roman Werpachowski Send private email
Wednesday, November 22, 2006
 
 
And how about the sound a faster disk generates? Do you hear a difference between a 5400rpm and 7200rpm disk?
D
Thursday, November 23, 2006
 
 
Roman,

what are you implying that I said?
Zach M.
Monday, November 27, 2006
 
 
Thanks everybody!
midtown programmer Send private email
Tuesday, November 28, 2006
 
 

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