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POLL : How many ISV here use Delphi ?

How many of you guys use Delphi to
write your products ?
EagleSoft
Friday, May 12, 2006
 
 
Me, but I'm not an ISV any longer.  I work at a 20,000 person company and am "under the radar".
steveo
Friday, May 12, 2006
 
 
Eagle,

I know of one ISV that has been using Delphi for several years. ZuggSoft at http://www.zuggsoft.com

This is a two person outfit, out in Colorado. They exist in a niche market. I'm just one of their happy customers. :)
slartibartfast Send private email
Friday, May 12, 2006
 
 
I'm using Delphi "parttime" (I'm not an ISV though).

What constantly amazes me is that although I use it only about 5% of my time, I still get stuff done faster than with everything else...

Could be that I don't know .NET well enough yet.

Anyway if I was an ISV I wouldn't anything else (for typical Win32 business apps, client server style).

.NET or Web is a different story.
Fritz Huber Send private email
Friday, May 12, 2006
 
 
I've used C++ Builder, which is based on the same app framework.
MBJ Send private email
Friday, May 12, 2006
 
 
I'm no longer doing active development, but I use it all the time to prototype interfaces.

Why is this relevant to you?
Karl Perry Send private email
Friday, May 12, 2006
 
 
"Why is this relevant to you?"

Because I'm trying to figure out if Delphi is viable
as a dev tool for a small ISV (shrinkwrap application)

One way of figuring that out, is asking ISV out here
if they've any successful products that have been developed using Delphi :-)

You can call me a smart ass :-D
EagleSoft
Friday, May 12, 2006
 
 
I'm using Delphi for our product at my day job.

It's realy good for some things, like throwing together a form quickly and dealing with a database.  To write maintainable code that can survive major upheavals like changing your database from Paradox to SQL Server, it isn't any faster than anything else.

If your chief criteria is getting something out the door quickly that looks good (which is a reasonable and even important goal for a new ISV), Delphi is a good choice, even with the steep price tag.

The thing you want to be careful of is that Borland's development tools division has a very short future.  It would not be wise to purchase this product with the assumption that it will be around five years from now, just as your business is starting to go well.  It is highly likely that both Delphi and Borland's development tools division will go the way of the dodo by then.
Clay Dowling Send private email
Friday, May 12, 2006
 
 
We've used Delphi 6 since 2002, and every other version before it.

If Borland had ceased to exist the day after releasing Delphi 6 Update Pack 2, which was several years ago, it wouldn't have caused us a problem. If a program works and its users know how to use it, the state of its creator is irrelevant.
cja Send private email
Friday, May 12, 2006
 
 
I use it.

Delphi is the *perfect* tool for ISV. You have pwer, flexibility and very LARGE poll of components and tools.

You can look at some:

www.remobjects.com
www.devexpress.com
www.tmssoftware.com

and the list is very large. From maths, scientific, twain support, multimedia, robot control, videogames, database, reporting... name it an exist a component or code in Delphi that is available and is not rare that is best than the used in other tools.

Deployment is done the rigth way: Your dependencies are only YOUR FILES and a OS. Done.

Some FUD surround Delphi from the start, and is rigth that the actual split of Borland (the company for enterprise) and the new "DevCo" (the company for developers) are not helping much, specially for new people with not experience with it, but, look at this:

http://blogs.borland.com/

Borland is activelly recruiting people for the new DevCo!
Mario A. Montoya Send private email
Friday, May 12, 2006
 
 
We use C++ Builder and we just recently upgraded to their Developer Studio.

Our flagship accounting/erp/edi software is written using VCL, C++, and the Borland point-n-click GUI tools.

I've been using Borland tools since the Win311 days.  C++ Builder 1,3,5, and now BDS were all my stepping stones along the way.

We also use BDS for a number of small utility like applications.

Our accounting application has over 200 modules for various functionality (BPL/DLL files).

I no longer use the TDatabase components -- just too lacking for an enterprise solution but for small apps, no problem.  I wrote our own database wrapper classes around LIBPQ for PostgreSQL.

All in all, I'm very satisfied with the environment.
~Eric
Friday, May 12, 2006
 
 
I work at a small ISV (4 developers). We use Delphi 6 for our applications and are very satisfied.

In spite of the fact that Delphi 6 is quite old, it has excellent support from 3rd party components writers.

We are thinking of moving to a newer version (such as Delphi 2006) but for now the old Delphi 6 is very good for us.

It's also extremely competitive with Visual Studio .NET 2003 (the last version of VS .NET I tried) because the controls are a lot less buggy.

Of course the VS .NET people who never tried Delphi will say it's not so, but the Delphi developers know better. :)

I have noticed that Borland is hiring people to work on the next version of Delphi (codename Highlander), so I think Delphi has a future.
Zaphod
Friday, May 12, 2006
 
 
I use it, both in my full-time day job and as a consultant part-time evenings and weekends.

Clay:

"The thing you want to be careful of is that Borland's development tools division has a very short future. "

Bull. The developer tools division (JBuilder, Delphi, C++ Builder, Interbase, etc) are being spun off to a separate company in order to allow the money earned by the developer tools to be reinvested in the developer tools. The tools division (currently being called "DevCo") currently is looking to fill 15 full-time positions (as well as some internships), and is in the process of negotiations with more than one potential purchaser.

If you're going to say something that reflects badly on an individual or a business, you should at least have a clue about what you're saying.
Ken
Friday, May 12, 2006
 
 
I have been an happy delphi user since 1999 and use it for pretty much all my development work (except for some webbased work)
Bert Neef
Friday, May 12, 2006
 
 
"Bull. The developer tools division (JBuilder, Delphi, C++ Builder, Interbase, etc) are being spun off to a separate company in order to allow the money earned by the developer tools to be reinvested in the developer tools."

Of course, that's not the entire story either. They are spinning off dev tools because they fancy themselves as Inprise again. They do not view the IDE business as an asset anymore. They said that themselves.
MBJ Send private email
Friday, May 12, 2006
 
 
BTW, is there an advantage in using Delphi.Net over VB.Net or C# if they're all going to be turned into bytecode anyway?
Fred
Friday, May 12, 2006
 
 
"... is there an advantage in using Delphi.Net over VB.Net or C# if they're all going to be turned into bytecode anyway?"

If you are a Delphi or Pascal developer, yes.  If you are a VB or C# developer, then maybe not.

.Net allows developers to use the language they are familiar with and end up with a CLR.

The big advantage of Delphi, though, has been that its IDE is far superior to Microsoft's.
Karl Perry Send private email
Friday, May 12, 2006
 
 
Two popular integrated resource-planning tools, LEAP and WEAP, are written in Delphi, and the developers seem very happy with it.

LEAP: http://forums.seib.org/leap/default.asp?action=72
WEAP: http://www.weap21.org/index.asp?doc=03
EKB Send private email
Friday, May 12, 2006
 
 
As an ISV, with complete power over your choice of tool-set Delphi is hard to beat.

The intuitive, elegant, clean and powerful VCL (Visual Component Framewwork) allows you to quickly prototype and build applications.

Delphi and its very large and robust community 3rd party vendors excels at DB apps, socket (internet) servers, encryption, pdf readers and writers, web application frameworks (there are several to choose from), native embedded DB Engines, distubuted N-Tier computing framework, myriad GUI components the list goes on and on.  And that's just for the Win32 framework.  Win64 support is on the Delphi Road Map.  The Win32/64 compilers produce lean, mean and clean, no muss, no fuss, small foot-print executables that allow for easy deployment and maintenance without the need for complex installation and maintenance within a complicated matrix "Framework" consideration.  Deploying a Win32 Delphi executable can be as easy as dropping the executable on the hard-disk and running it.  Perfect for shrink-wrapped applications.

On the .NET side, Delphi offers ECO which is a bleeding edge MDA (Model Drivern Architecture) Framework that allows you to build desktop and web appliction from UML diagrams.  This technology could very well be a glimpse into the future of software engineering.

And I've just scratched the surface.  I think software developers who are not familiar with Delphi would be astonished to find just how rich, deep and robust the Delphi community and its toolset actually is.

And yes I use Delphi for my own product development.

Delphi 2006 supports Delphi (Object Pascal), C++, and C# .



Cheers.

-d
Dennis Landi
Saturday, May 13, 2006
 
 
"BTW, is there an advantage in using Delphi.Net over VB.Net or C# if they're all going to be turned into bytecode anyway?"

One question to ask first is: Why using dotNET at all? But I won't go into this now.

One thing is unique to Delphi.NET: The ability to write VCL.NET Programs, that is programs that do not use Winforms directly but through a compatibility layer based on the Borland Visual Component library. Since Microsoft has already stated that Winforms are only a temporary solution, and OTOH Borland stated that they will have a VCL-Layer for whatever Microsoft will use after that, you are likely to be able to just recompile for the new stuff.

As for VB.NET: It is Visual Basic finally done right (that is, it can now be counted as a serious OO programming language) and at the same time screwed up beyond repair (that is, it is no longer Visual Basic since the compatibility is gone).

Delphi.NET on the other hand is still Delphi, just with the changes necessary to make it dotNET compliant.

So, if you have used VB6, I don't advice migrating to VB.NET (been there done that, regretted it), your prevous experience will not help you and you will not be able to use much of your existing code.

If you have Delphi experience and a code base, Delphi.NET will let you continue using both.

If you have neither Delphi nor VB6 experience, you are free to choose. I do not recommend VB.NET here either. What would be the point? Stick with something mainstream, e.g. C# or Delphi, if you have any confidence in it. If you have some experience with a C/C++ like language, I guess C# would be the choice.
Thomas Mueller Send private email
Saturday, May 13, 2006
 
 
I'm using Delphi at my day work.
Coding projects for my firm (about 1200 poeple).

The strenght of delphi :

 - Real RAD, No framework to deploy
 - Can work with *any* database
 - 3rd Party Comp
 - Great community

We do not plan to migrate to VS 2005 since we are really pleased with Delphi (and we don't see any benefit to move to .net...).

Best Regards

Stephane Wierzbicki
Stephane Wierzbicki
Saturday, May 13, 2006
 
 
Just to reply to the original topic:

I am using Delphi 2006 at work, but it is not the main programming language of the company, we also use Java, Visual Basic 6, VC++ and C#. I like Delphi most, though.

I don't know what I would choose if I were to start from scratch. The situation about the Borland Developer Tools Group is still in flux, so we will have to wait what form of spin off will finally emerge. The people there seem to have faith in the viability of the new company and they have started hiring new developers for it. That at least is a good sign.
Thomas Mueller Send private email
Saturday, May 13, 2006
 
 
Delphi gives the edge for Windwos GUI work but for my performance-intensive Delphi code I use the Free Pascal compiler because it can generate 64-bit assembly/EXE.

Also for cross-platform ability, I use Free Pascal/Lazarus. Delphi 7 remains the best IDE for Object Pascal.

Since Borland has more or less abandoned Delphi, I strongly recommend getting involved in the Free Pascal project.

Even though Borland made some noises about "selling" Delphi (which now turned out to be a lie), and even though they suddenly claim "64-bits and Unicode is on the roadmap", even if it's true, it won't do much good because their new IDE is written in C# .net and just doesn't cut it.

So, for me it's good old Delphi 7 and Free Pascal for the 64-bit bits and as a migration path to open source, cross-platform, Unicode-able, 64-bit.
Frank de Groot Send private email
Saturday, May 13, 2006
 
 
There are lots of ISVs using Delphi. Go here for a list of applications written in Delphi:

http://tinyurl.com/loahz
which link to:
http://delphi.wikia.com/wiki/Good_Quality_Applications_Built_With_Delphi
Richard Foersom Send private email
Saturday, May 13, 2006
 
 
All of my current products - LP Recorder, LP Ripper, WAV Joiner and Home or Away - League Scheduling software have been developed 100% in Delphi. My experience has demonstrated that Delphi is certainly viable as a dev tool for a small ISV. CFB Software was established in 1997 and it became more than successful enough to make it my full-time occupation about 5 years ago.
Chris Burrows Send private email
Saturday, May 13, 2006
 
 
I am a very happy ISV-user of Delphi... Delphi has let me compete against much larger shops successfully and the Delphi community is second to none!

Joe Hendricks
Joe Hendricks Send private email
Saturday, May 13, 2006
 
 
Another vote in favour of Delphi.

One of the things I've always liked about Delphi is that everything you need is usually rolled in to the EXE.  Having to ship or rely on additional pieces (DLLs, assemblies, etc...) is the exception instead of the rule.  This lack of dependencies makes deployment and support easier.  Not a bad thing for an ISV when you can't really afford to hand hold every installation.

Delphi has any number of other advantages.  Lurk in some of the Borland public news groups or check out the Delphi related blog feeds for different takes on these.

http://support.borland.com/entry.jspa?entryID=292

http://www.delphifeeds.com/
Bruce McGee
Saturday, May 13, 2006
 
 
I've been using Delphi exclusively since first release in 1995. I have experience in many other languages but prefer Delphi (nee Pascal). With .Net, I have no problem using other .Net languages as well (i.e. C#) but would still prefer using the BDS IDE to do so. I am currently getting work for both native (Win32) and .Net projects using Delphi.
Wayne Niddery Send private email
Saturday, May 13, 2006
 
 
MBJ --

Borland most definitively and decisively did *NOT* say that Delphi is no longer an asset.  They aren't "abandoning" or "dumping" Delphi.  This is simply /false/.  Call up Tod Nielsen, Borland's CEO, and ask him yourself.  Those rumors simply are not true.

The IDE's are being spun off because Borland realized that they were trying to please two masters, and thus weren't doing well with either.  The IDE tools division had revenues of $84,000,000 last year.  The division was profitable.  The new company will  be profitable right from the get go, and the profits will be used to fund future development and no longer siphoned off to fund other projects.    64-bit is on the roadmap.  .Net 2.0 support is in active development.  The products are all being moved forward to meet the needs of the changing technology, all with an almost fanatical concern for backwards compatibility.  (VB developers take note).

Just trying to clear up the FUD.

Nick Hodges
Nick Hodges Send private email
Saturday, May 13, 2006
 
 
"The thing you want to be careful of is that Borland's development tools division has a very short future.  It would not be wise to purchase this product with the assumption that it will be around five years from now, just as your business is starting to go well.  It is highly likely that both Delphi and Borland's development tools division will go the way of the dodo by then."

Back in 1996 my manager had a consultant compare the various PC development tools. This is basically the same comment made back then, that Borland would soon be put out of business by Microsoft, that we choose to use VB. I still would say that Delphi was the better choice then, but I didn't really care as I soon moved on.
"Help, help! I'm being repressed!"
Saturday, May 13, 2006
 
 
I use Delphi (BDS 2006) at my employer (hospital IT department).

I also do "side" projects - which are normally custom, vertical market apps for healthcare related facilities in my area.
Dale Send private email
Saturday, May 13, 2006
 
 
For work (http://www.fab-online.com) and for fun.

Delphi is a great tool and I like programming in Pascal (or ObjectPascal or Delphi or whatever it is called at the moment).
Primoz Gabrijelcic
Saturday, May 13, 2006
 
 
"It would not be wise to purchase this product with the assumption that it will be around five years from now, just as your business is starting to go well. "

I really frown on comments like this.  I respond with a big SO WHAT.

My CDROM with CBuilder 1,5, 6 or BDS will still install and compile applications written with it for years to come whether Borland is around to support it or not.  Just because the company [Borland or other] is gone does not mean your tools will all of a sudden stop working.

If you genuinely are afraid of such situations then I think you had better rethink your over all strategy as a software development house.

For what it's worth:  I think Delphi and CBuilder will be around simply because they have mature existing markets.  If those markets are too small for Borland, then I'm quite confident someone else will come along and scoop up those profit generating products.
~Eric
Saturday, May 13, 2006
 
 
We use C++ Builder a lot at DonationCoder.com.

From my standpoint it's an ideal tool for rapid serious gui-centric applications and the availability of 3rd party components is the real win.  It does a better job of RAD then any other platform i've seen.

semi-plug: We are running a C++ Builder programming contest through July 15, 2006: http://bcbcontest.donationcoder.com/
j.r. Send private email
Saturday, May 13, 2006
 
 
We currently use C++ Builder for EPOS development and have recently upgraded to the 2006 version.  This version is a huge improvement over version 6.

I have used C++ Builder since starting university and its excellent.  I really hope that Delphi/C++ Builder continues its success with "DevCo".

Stu ;o)
Stuart Kelly Send private email
Saturday, May 13, 2006
 
 
We use Delphi since version 1 and use now BDS2006. We also use VS2005 but BDS2006 is, and will be, our first choice for development (Win32 and .NET).
roland
Saturday, May 13, 2006
 
 
I've been using Delphi every day for the last 10 years.
I imagine I'm going to use it for many more and I'm looking forward to it. The new "DevCo" is exciting news.
Ondrej Kelle
Saturday, May 13, 2006
 
 
Starting from Delphi 3, I have used Delphi 5, 7 and now Delphi 2006 for Win 32 development. With Delphi 2006 I have started a .NET project with VCL.NET.
T.G.
Saturday, May 13, 2006
 
 
I use Delphi...  Of course I may be a little biased... :-)

Allen Bauer
Delphi/C++Builder/C#Builder Chief Scientist
Developer Tools Group - Borland
Allen Bauer Send private email
Saturday, May 13, 2006
 
 
We've been using Delphi since version 1!  We are staff of from 6-9 developers depending on workload - we find Delphi a perfect tool for building appplications, services, you name it... we do a great deal of work customizing our apps for various client firms, and  find Delphi works well for us in this environment of tight schedules and always changing requirements. Lately we've built a number of Soap webservices in Delphi.
Michael Stein Send private email
Saturday, May 13, 2006
 
 
I've used Delphi as an ISV and then as a contractor/consultant and now as an IT staff person at a university. i consider it my secret weapon with which I produce more and better code faster than with any other system I have known about.

The Delphi community is large, friendly, helpful, and healthy, despite truly outrageous FUD regularly dispelled.

I've had my criticisms of Borland over the years but the product, itself, is largely first class. The latest news gives me much hope that I will never have to abandon this product!
Doug C
Saturday, May 13, 2006
 
 
I do, check out PG Lightning Admin:
http://www.amsoftwaredesign.com
PG Lightning Admin is a administration tool
for the excellent Postgresql RDBMS.

Delphi 2006 just blows VS and .net out of the water
for just about anything you need to do.

I also work for a huge bank and one of my
internal Delphi apps is deployed on 10,000+ PCs and
servers.
Tony Caduto Send private email
Saturday, May 13, 2006
 
 
I have been using it since 94.  I currently do all my application programming in it.  I spent 3 years doing C++ and C# and was quite gratefull to return to delphi.

C# is great, except for having to install the .net framework.  This is a killer for downloadable software.

Sean
Sean Cross Send private email
Saturday, May 13, 2006
 
 
We currently have 25 Delphi developers.  Delphi is a great RAD tool with perfect track record.  Our application was originally developed in VB 3; when we attempted to upgrade to VB 5, we had to mostly re-write.  We evaluated Delphi 1 in 1995 and since then we have upgraded to most recent versions with little or NO CODE change.  Currently we are using BDS 2006 and it is very stable.
3LOG Systems Send private email
Sunday, May 14, 2006
 
 
We using delphi for develop our websystem (WCMS) that drives more than 50 webpages.

Nils Bödeker
Eugen Ulmer Publishing House
Nils Bödeker Send private email
Sunday, May 14, 2006
 
 
We are a small ISV (just three developers) writing loans administration software for large companies.

We have used Delphi exclusively since version 1 and have absolutely no intention to change.

Delphi has handled every requirement we have had perfectly: database stuff, image storage and manipulation, word processing and letter generation, xml server running as a process and so on.

And our applications compile into one exe with a couple of dlls which are under our control.  No installation issues at all.  Want a test system ? Just copy the directory and change the database connection.  Want to move to another server ?  Just copy the directory and change the database connection.
Jim Mellish Send private email
Sunday, May 14, 2006
 
 
We use Delphi to develop all our Windows desktop software. Delphi is powerful, flexible, and easy to use. That doesn't mean it should be used for everything though (use the right tool for the right job).
Michael Leaver Send private email
Sunday, May 14, 2006
 
 
We use Delphi and Borland Developer Studio 2006 for all of our Win32 and .NET 1.1 work.  The list of 3rd VCL components for Win32 development is awesome too.
Kirby Turner
Sunday, May 14, 2006
 
 
Our company, Visionutveckling, is one of the larger providers of "call forwarding systems" (the actual product description isn't readily conveyed in English) in the Scandinavian market. Our CTI systems affect in rough estimates about a quarter of a million people. Many of the larger companies and hospitals in Sweden use our software as the backbone of their telephone systems, and we're directly competing with well-known international companies like Ericsson.

Our software is written entirely in Delphi. We wouldn't have succeeded the way we have otherwise.
Mats Gefvert Send private email
Sunday, May 14, 2006
 
 
I use Borland Developer Studio – Delphi language every day in my one-man shop, primarily for ASP.NET web applications and  win32 desktop applications. Honestly it’s the only developer tool witch give me full support for win32 (even win 16 bits) and  the .NET framework. That meaning that I can support my old project and make new ones in win32 or .NET, make ASP.NET applications, web services and that even in 3 languages – Delphi/Pascal,  C# and C++. All with the same developer tool.

Anders
Anders Pedersen Send private email
Sunday, May 14, 2006
 
 
We are using Delphi for our Windows applications. It gives us very rich client interface and raw server power. The company I work for develops network analysis and security applications, therefore we need a flexible tool, and Delphi can be used from low level programming to high level RAD development for user interfaces - all in one language/tool. Any other tool would require to use probably two languages and tool sets, i.e. C/C++ and Java/c#.
Luigi D. Sandon Send private email
Sunday, May 14, 2006
 
 
"Currently we are using BDS 2006 and it is very stable."

LMAO
John H Send private email
Sunday, May 14, 2006
 
 
For Windows development we use Delphi, for Linux we use Kylix. For non-UI stuff you can use virtually the same code-base for Windows and Linux.

Not so sure about the latest version (BDS), though.
Ewan McNab Send private email
Sunday, May 14, 2006
 
 
My primary employer is a small ISV in Scottsdale Arizona.  They have used Delphi successfully for quite a few years starting with Delphi 4 through 7.  They haven't made the jump yet to BDS 2006 due to resource limitations to properly test the new platform.

I do agree with many comments here, while Delphi may or may not be killed in the tools spin-off is in the hands of the market.  If the market values the tools in the spinoff they'll survive; if not they'll die off.

Regardless, there are other factors you must consider.
1.  What languages do you/your developers use?
2.  What platform(s) do you want to support?
3.  If your seeking VC money; tool language might matter.
4.  How many potential employee's are in your area that know the language?

If I was going to build a company that was win32/64 Delphi is really the only RAD choice left.  If your targeting ".net" then you do have other choices.  VCL.NET is (IMO) not an option.  There are VERY little VCL components that have mapped VCL.NET components out there.  If your application is Forms heavy like my employer then that is a serious issue for future migration/exit strategy plans.
Just my 2-cents
Michael Send private email
Sunday, May 14, 2006
 
 
"The intuitive, elegant, clean and powerful VCL (Visual Component Framewwork) allows you to quickly prototype and build applications."

yes, except that the VCL (from Borland) doesn't support unicode.  (And, yes, I understand why, but the fact remains). There is a third party alternative with a limited set of controls that are unicode compliant.

I LOVE delphi. It love it's elegance, the single EXE deployment, etc. However, I have some serious issues.

I'm not saying these things make Delphi "bad". I'm suggesting they are part of the reason that Delphi hasn't been as successful as it could be.

MY ISSUES with delphi:
1. Difficult to find code examples. E.g., can't find any working code samples for using the Windows SAPI 5.1 (latest I think) Speech SDK for speech recognition.

And I've tested trying to find other code examples. The above is just the most egregious.

Yes, I could get a third party tool to do the Speech Recognition, but most I found didn't mention SAPI5.1. It seems they are withering on the vine. I also don't like using a wrapper arounnd the base code. (Yes, that SHOULD be an advantage when evaluating Delphi since it codes closer "to the metal")


2. VCL not unicode capable.

3. When you upgrade to a new Delphi version you have to get all new third party tools b/c they are version-specific compiled. (BCL files, I think they're called).
VB 3 to vb5 had the same problem, but MS wasn't CONSTANTLY coming out with a new VB version every year.  (It was a while between 3 and 4 and 4 to 5 to 6 was largely compatible vis-a-vis third party controls.


This results in a second problem:

4. The consultants that I HAVE talked to are all on different, usually older, versions of Delphi. Delphi was SOO good and the problem from 3 above created a barrier to upgrade (how dumb is THAT??), leaving a lot of consultants on older versions.

5. If Borland DOES go away, my Delphi 2005 won't register on a new computer and I WOULD be screwed, since it registers with thier website. (I DOUBT Delphi will truly vanish from the earth, so this is unlikely, I admit).

6. The initial learning curve with Delphi was DAUNTING for me, as a vb programamer. And I couldn't much newbie help for the basic stuff like the fact that you have to declare a fundtion's interface and then redeclare it's implementation. I know this is standard for C++, etc.  And after I relearned it I remembered that's how we did it back in CS in college (before I transfered to EE).

That turns off a lot of casual programmers. I know the hard core programmers LIKE IT this way, but they they wonder why Delphi isn't more popular. The large number of vb users generated an ecosystem the supported VB3/5/6 (more than it deserved ;-). 


I LOVE Delphi, but even for my shrinkwrap software,there are significant issues.

And vb.net has some SERIOUS deployment issues and some less serious bugs, but I think it has legs.

If I were using Delphi NOW, I would stick with it. No question. But to convert to is? Serious doubts.
Mr. Analogy {uISV} Send private email
Sunday, May 14, 2006
 
 
"Because I'm trying to figure out if Delphi is viable
as a dev tool for a small ISV (shrinkwrap application)"

Sure, I've been using it since D1 for shrink-wrap apps. That's all I've ever used it for.
Harley Pebley Send private email
Sunday, May 14, 2006
 
 
I'm working in Delphi for ISV (developing a system tool), and for local University I'm developing real-time EEG processing software in Delphi too.
architect
Sunday, May 14, 2006
 
 
We have been using Delphi for a long time. We developed a 3-tier and web-based portfolio management system with Delphi. It's the best windows (Win32) development tool!! We may even use it for .Net development.
Vikram Kulkarni Send private email
Sunday, May 14, 2006
 
 
Since Mister Bauer has checked in, perhaps he can explain the dismal BDS 2005 release, and talk us into trusting a company (what is it this week?  DevCo?) that would release such an expensive piece of steaming crap.

Allen: everyone that spent $$$ on BDS 2005 got a _free_ upgrade to the (slighly less stinky) BDS 2006, right?

Wrong.

Delphi was great around the D5/D6 timeframe.  The key Delphi developers at Borland pushed off long ago.  This ship has sailed, pure and simple.

Nick ... <sound of hand slapping forehead> ... you are dreaming.
Mitch & Murray (from Downtown)
Monday, May 15, 2006
 
 
We've been using Delphi for years now.

Delphi 6, 7 and BDS 2006 are all being used at our shop.

We develop database tools for database developers.

See www.upscene.com
Martijn Tonies Send private email
Monday, May 15, 2006
 
 
We're using Delphi for our products ever since late 1995 and are not planning on switching to anything else in the foreseeable future.
Oliver Giesen
Monday, May 15, 2006
 
 
Hi,

I'm a partner in a small ISV, and we're using Delphi (version 7) to develop our products. I constantly check alternatives, in case Delphi gets in trouble, but so far nothing comes close.

My 2 wishes to make Delphi the absolute best:

1. Add Linux support to the compiler.

2. Open source the RTL and the VCL, so the developer community can fix bugs quickly and port the code to other environments (eg. Linux/QT, Linux/GTK, etc.)

Eyal Zvi
Bikoret Bona Ltd.
Eyal Zvi
Monday, May 15, 2006
 
 
My (admittedly optimistic) spin on this is that Delphi somehow managed to stay the best choice of Windows development platform for small ISVs even throughout /years/ of mismanagement and non-marketing in the hated Inprise era...that must say something about its inherent qualities...

Hopefully now that the product will be parented by a smaller, developer focused operation like DevCo run by real Delphi people, those lingering clouds of doubt will hopefully clear away for good...
Lurkio
Monday, May 15, 2006
 
 
We are a small ISV and Consultancy host of 3 people. We use Delphi as much as possible on our own projects, and .net when requested to by clients. Very very fast to develop with, great OO features. Currently using Delphi 2006, a little bit of Delphi.NET and alot of Win32 code. The absolute best thing about Delphi is access to the source code for the whole framework.
David Glassborow Send private email
Monday, May 15, 2006
 
 
We have been using Delphi as our main development tool for our insurance system since 1997. It's a great compiler and we have no plans to change it. We use all sorts of other languages/scripts, technologies and components for different parts of the system, such as a TSQL, JavaScript, ASP, ASP.NET bits of VBA etc...whatever is right for the job..but the main Windows UI is all in Delphi. We love it!
Simon Whittle
Monday, May 15, 2006
 
 
I develop big in-house software, so I'm not an ISV. But we've used Delphi since 1997 and it is totally awesome. Our current version is Delphi 6 and we haven't encountered any reason to upgrade to a newer version.

Delphi has a very elegant language with good O-O features, integrated COM support (anybody remember COM? we're using it!), blazing compiler speed, fast native code, great 3rd party component support, etc. I love it.
Full Name
Monday, May 15, 2006
 
 
Me!
Nuno Mendes Send private email
Monday, May 15, 2006
 
 
We are a hardware manufacturer that makes battery powered data loggers and controllers. We produce software to support our hardware. Some software is free and some is for sale. Some of us use Visual Studio. Some of us use Java (using IntelliJ IDEA) for crossplatform apps (Windows and OS X) and some use Borland's C++ Builder / Delphi. The C++ Builder apps have faster turn-around (updates come quicker) and are the largest apps (in complexity, they have built-in graphing, a full IDE and also compile our proprietary embedded language for download to our hardware) but the others (Visual Studio and Java) have the larger teams and go out with our better selling hardware (and also include graphing).

I've used them all and prefer C++ Builder / Delphi. And Borland (or the new split-off company) and a few others are what keeps Microsoft honest in the languages area.

Regards,
Jim Dodd
Onset Computer Corp.
Jim Dodd Send private email
Monday, May 15, 2006
 
 
At the ISV where I work, it has been Delphi from the beginning, and Turbo Pascal before that.

Ease of deployment, yes. But more importantly, over the years I've enjoyed doing "the impossible" with Delphi because I could produce applications quickly as if I were doing VB, but they were complex and powerful as if I had used C++.
Teller Send private email
Monday, May 15, 2006
 
 
We use Delphi to build our apps.  We are an ISV with a hosted, branded, configurable application for data collection and analysis.  Our solution includes mobile applications running on Palm (C++) and Windows Mobile (C#), web portals written as ISAPIs with Delphi web-broker, and a few windows clients written in Delphi.  You can check it out at http://www.eyeonsolutions.com.

If you have any questions let me know. 

Josh
Josh R Roberts Send private email
Monday, May 15, 2006
 
 
Mr. Analogy,

"1. Difficult to find code examples. E.g., can't find any working code samples for using the Windows SAPI 5.1 (latest I think) Speech SDK for speech recognition."

Hmmm... Took about 30 seconds to find this one:

http://bdn.borland.com/article/0,1410,29583,00.html

"2. VCL not unicode capable."

The next version will be, from what I understand.

"3. When you upgrade to a new Delphi version you have to get all new third party tools b/c they are version-specific compiled. (BCL files, I think they're called)."

The rule of almost all Delphi developers I know or have talked to know that, to ensure your third-party components are compatible with the next version of Delphi you *always* buy the source code. No worthwhile Delphi components come without source code also being available (sometimes always included, sometimes an extra-cost option). When I was selling a set of VCL components, I didn't have an option to purchase without the source; the source was included in each and every copy I sold.

Ken
Ken
Monday, May 15, 2006
 
 
We have a remote sales product used nationwide in the food industry. The client and various server apps and utilities are all written in Delphi.
Jamie Swanson Send private email
Monday, May 15, 2006
 
 
Nick Hodges –

I didn’t say Delphi wasn’t a money-maker (The last CEO said Delphi was a cash cow, IIRC), simply that Borland does not view the IDE business (or IDEs in general) as an asset to their ALM business. They seem to feels IDEs are dead; probably due to Eclipse. Inprise is back.

As far as 64-bit support, last I heard Delphi was to get 64-bit support (and generics) via .NET, not as a native compiler or a 64-bit VCL. Has this changed?
MBJ Send private email
Monday, May 15, 2006
 
 
Delphi is excellent for commericial, shrink-wrapped apps.  All of my company's apps are created with it.  Its well suited for both your everyday business database tool and for graphics intensive apps.  Plus if you use the right components you can usually produce an app that doesnt require any additional dll's, making distribution simpler.

For desktop apps, I'd recommend staying with the Win32 compiler.
Ed
Monday, May 15, 2006
 
 
We (www.inhouse-software.com) do.  We build two database systems that support small oil&gas companies.  One for Land, GeoNexus, and one for Accounting, JVNexus.  Delphi has been our development platform since 1998.  A major strength of Delphi is the variety of 3rd-party components.  Several of the key features of our products are enabled by pieces built by other companies (DevExpress, etc).  I've been producing Delphi applications since before D1 was officially released (for legal reasons, we couldn't ship our product since it was built with a "preview" version).  We now use D7 and D2006.
Terry Wray Send private email
Monday, May 15, 2006
 
 
We are currently migrating to BDS 2006 from Delphi 6.
Nothing compares to the RAD that Delphi gives you.
Wrote a full featured London Stock Exchange trading system (used by broker firms and banks) in 4 months consisting of a front-end and multiple NT-Services. The NT-services allows front-end connections and connects to the LSE and MS SQL. We make extensive use of native TCP-IP & Multicast messaging (No data aware controls on front-ends!). This is a time/mission critical system that has sub second responsiveness (up to 42 registered traders per firm over 9 branches). Now I challenge the large VS crowd to do this USING 3 PEOPLE Developers/Architects/Analysts (shame, one of the 3 cannot code).

Delphi ROCKS!
GO DEVCO!
JP Send private email
Tuesday, May 16, 2006
 
 
MBJ -

"As far as 64-bit support, last I heard Delphi was to get 64-bit support (and generics) via .NET, not as a native compiler or a 64-bit VCL. Has this changed?"

Here's the Roadmap released by Borland for Delphi :

http://blogs.borland.com/davidi/archive/2005/10/03/21548.aspx

AFAIR, it has been freshly updated in the DevCo era and native Win64 support is still very much in the pipeline (otherwise there would quite frankly have been civil war in the Delphi non-tech newsgroup <g>)

Also, AFAIK, generics are in the pipeline for the native VCL as well - though hopefully someone else can chime in on whether this is correct, too.
Lurkio
Tuesday, May 16, 2006
 
 
MBJ --

Sorry, but you are spreading more FUD.  Borland has /never/ said that they thing "IDE's are dead" or anything remotely like that. That's just plain wrong.

Nick
Nick Hodges Send private email
Tuesday, May 16, 2006
 
 
"Mitch and Murray" --

What, exactly, am I dreaming about?

Nick
Nick Hodges Send private email
Tuesday, May 16, 2006
 
 
I use Delphi for several commercial apps, and have used it for ages. While I like the language over C / C++ / VB / Java / C#, I must admit that the recent versions (2005 and 2006) are not very good - they're slow, the UI basically just sucks (it's a cheap VS copy), and there are a lot of bugs even with all the updates applied.

If I were to start a new company / product now, I'd look into alternatives. Not happily, but I'm really just tired of seeing those "Catastrophic failure!"s all the time.
El Dorko
Tuesday, May 16, 2006
 
 
I've worked for three ISVs, all of which have used Borland's developer tools.

My current employer produces HealthCare related software.  The company used Turbo Pascal for the first package for MS-DOS (previous products were for AS400).  When we transitioned to Win32, Delphi was the obvious choice.  We've been using Delphi 6 for the past four years and love it.  Although we have one copy of BDS 2006 and we're planning on doing a full upgrade after our next release.

My previous employer produces County tax related software (assessment, tax collection, etc).  The company used Paradox for the first package for MS-DOS (still in use today).  Again, Delphi was the obvious choice.

My first ISV employer produced educational software.  The company used Borland C++ for the first package for MS-DOS.  Here, C++ Builder was the obvious choice for Win32 development.  We ported over half of our code from DOS to Win32 with either no code changes or very very minor code changes.  The GUI and hardware specific stuff (like sound and animation) took a little more work.
Jon Robertson
Tuesday, May 16, 2006
 
 
It is amazing how many folks still think Delphi is dying any day now.  Even if you *don't* count more than a decade of Turbo Pascal, Delphi has been around longer than almost any other environment.  I am so thankful we didn't standardize on VB in 1995 when we started using D1.

We are an ISV building large healthcare systems.  All in D7.
John Williams Send private email
Tuesday, May 16, 2006
 
 
I work for a company that is making year-ending software for the norwegian market, used by auditors and accountants at companies ranging in size from one-man-shops to big internationals. We use Delphi (for Win32), and so do our two major competitors. Between us there are around 10 000 customers, and probably between 30 000 to 50 000 end-users!
Ottar Holstad
Tuesday, May 16, 2006
 
 
<quote>
Boz Elloy, senior vice president of software products at Borland, said, "We're really focusing on the ALM portion. Stand-alone IDEs [are] not a growing business for us."

Instead, Borland has moved to Eclipse as the basis of its tool set. "The world has voted with its feet and has moved to Eclipse," Jackson said, noting that Borland's JBuilder is still the No. 1 commercial IDE. "Our focus on R&D is around innovation around the life cycle, not just the IDE."
</quote>

http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1759,1847835,00.asp?kc=EWRSS03129TX1K0000616

No FUD.
MBJ Send private email
Tuesday, May 16, 2006
 
 
I've been using Delphi since 1996 (when i discovered it knocked spots of C/C++) and continue to maintain many D6 projects. I also have several older systems in written D4/D3 and even D1(!?!).

I am increasingly finding my newest projects are .NET based and, after a certain amount of sole searching (regarding the whole Borland/DevCo mullarkey), have made the conscious decision to take the plunge with these in D2005.

Yes, it's got one or two quirks and isn't blisteringly quick, but once you've become familiar with them then you can still become very productive.

Part of me, I guess, didn't want to lose my investment in Delphi, by having to learn C#, but at the end of the day, if the worst came to the worst and Delphi disappeared (not that I think it will), it wouldn't exactly be rocket science to make the switch!

I am very encouraged by the growing length of this list and hope that DevCo get BDS back to the top on all levels (Win32/.NET/64-bit/CF etc) which I am sure it can!
David Cresswell Send private email
Wednesday, May 17, 2006
 
 
According to Wikopedia, the windows version of Skype is written in Delphi.

I personally use Delphi for 95% of all native code development.  Been using it since version 1, but stayed with version 6 for a long time.  Recently upgraded from that to 2006.  It's a bit irritating that we won't get .Net 2 support until the next version, but I can live with it.

If DevCo goes somewhere then there's every reason to stick with it.  Delphi is the jewel in the crown though - ideally they should drop JBuilder and possibly C++Builder too.
Kevin Woolley Send private email
Wednesday, May 17, 2006
 
 

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