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Naming conventions

What are sentiments in here about naming conventions for networks/machines?  I've been working in a place where machines are named things like:

"Computer1", "Computer2", ... "Server1", "Server2",...

It made me think of what it would be like if the solar system was "planet01", "planet02", ...

what a drab prospect.
t3rse Send private email
Friday, February 03, 2006
 
 
I name all of my personal machines after characters in my favorite cartoon: Spongebob Squarepants. My machines are named SQUIDWARD, PATRICK, KRABBS, SPONGEBOB, and PLANKTON.
Turtle Rustler
Friday, February 03, 2006
 
 
When I worked at a big company I asked the manager who is a pretty coold dude why all the servers had such boring names.  He said it was kind of awkward going to the suits saying, " We need money to buy more memory for CHEWBAKA".
Bill Rushmore Send private email
Friday, February 03, 2006
 
 
We used the book "The Discoverers" to find names.
Kyle Dyer Send private email
Friday, February 03, 2006
 
 
I use Xmen characters.: main server is Cerebro, laptop is Beast, access point is Rogue, etc.  ;)

One of my customers uses state and national capitals: London, Boise, Denver, etc.

Years ago, one of my employers used Matrix characters: Neo, Morpheus, Cypher, etc.

In a fitting bit of humor, Cypher was once compromised and used to cause damage throughout the rest of the network...
KC Send private email
Friday, February 03, 2006
 
 
We have this thread here every one in a while... So what? :)

My current employer is called "Olympic" -- so we named our servers Zeus, Poseidon, Athena and Styx (the gateway).

At home, I call my servers by the characters from "The Usual Suspects". So far I have Fenster, Verbal and Kobayashi, while the VMware installation of Fedora got called Redfoot (bonus points for those who know why). :)
Berislav Lopac Send private email
Friday, February 03, 2006
 
 
Because no one can be sure that Redfoot ever existed...
KC Send private email
Friday, February 03, 2006
 
 
The siliest recommendation I heard was to name your computers after thier mac addresses, because it is the only thing that is constant.
Grant
Friday, February 03, 2006
 
 
My computer is named Black Mesa - the research facility in the original Half-Life. :-)
nickelplate Send private email
Friday, February 03, 2006
 
 
tom and jerry (in a cluster)

Friday, February 03, 2006
 
 
A prof of mine used to name his computers after lord of the rings characters:
The windows machine was gollum: evil, but sometimes useful
the old unix server with the intermitant hardware failures was gandalf: very wise, but never there when you needed him
and his everyday linux machine was frodo.
danielsn
Friday, February 03, 2006
 
 
Satan, Lucifer, Beelzebub, Mephistopheles, etc.
clcr
Friday, February 03, 2006
 
 
My systems at home:
Orca, Valkyrie, Monkeybutt

At other companies they were named after colors, mountains and even star constellations.
QADude Send private email
Friday, February 03, 2006
 
 
Mine are after beaches (not popular among geeks: -1): Atalaia, Corvina and Marieta.
Lost in a code jungle
Friday, February 03, 2006
 
 
Before the last renaming, they were: Hell, Heaven and Newbie.
Lost in a code jungle
Friday, February 03, 2006
 
 
When I did MCSE all the MCSE texts recommended naming computers and printers based on their location and use, eg. "3rd floor accounts payable server". THAT is the stupidest idea of all, IMO, and it's a tiny bit gratifying to see that everyone else thinks so too.
NetFreak Send private email
Friday, February 03, 2006
 
 
Andre Torrez had a recent funny post about this:

  4. Don't be too cute. Naming things after Scientologists
    was fun until I had to tell the new hire what the naming
    scheme was and hope he wasn't a "Friend of L.Ron" and
    was going to somehow fill my water glass full of
    Thetans and damn me to a life under some volcano in
    Hemet, California.

http://notes.torrez.org/2006/01/naming_servers.html
Chris Winters Send private email
Friday, February 03, 2006
 
 
I have to wonder what the DNS hostname of "3rd floor accounts payable server" would be.
clcr
Friday, February 03, 2006
 
 
We had a huge discussion about exactly this on Gadgetopia.

http://www.gadgetopia.com/post/4608

It was one of the fastest-growing comment threads we've ever had -- everyone, it seems, had something to say about it.
Deane Send private email
Friday, February 03, 2006
 
 
I use fictional cities (Camelot, Shangrilah, Lauputa, Metropolis, Gotham, Rlyeh, Sarnath, etc.) which is relatively innocuous and has never raised any eyebrows, but I think that there are some good arguments to be made for other schemes:

First, I'm awfully close to running out of server names and will have to find a new naming scheme pretty soon. If I'd used a less imaginative convention (such as dutkyN, for my home systems) I wouldn't be in this pickle.

For devices whose physical location is of great importance (printers are the only member of this category, as far as I'm concerned) I think that naming them for their location is not a bad idea at all. When you go to configure a printer in Windows and all you see is a long list of meaningless names (fancifull or not) how are you supposed to know where to go pick up your print outs? Even if every printer has its name taped on it, you still might have to walk all over several floors of a large building to figure out where "frodo" or "HP-LaserWriter-IV-3" is located.

For all other devices, I have heard a good argument that the devices name should have NO RELATION to its purpose, location or configuration: If your network security is breached, you only make the intuder's life easier if you have named your servers things like "Accounting-1", "main-DNS" or "SparcStation20-2". For security reasons it is better to use meaningless names, fancifull or not.

For simplicity, however, I have no strong objection (aside from the whole Quest-for-the-Lost-Printer issue) to using boring names like "WS123", "DEV01", "TEST02" or "FILES3" rather than something more fancifull when naming machines in the workplace. The unimaginative and marginally descriptive names will help new people come up to speed faster and you won't have to worry about IT-folk with overactive imaginations and an underdeveloped sense of professional behavior.
Jeff Dutky Send private email
Friday, February 03, 2006
 
 
3rd FLoor Accounts Payable Server

3 FLAPS....
surreal
Friday, February 03, 2006
 
 
If you are serious about naming resources, you can use all the prefix and suffix that you like. They really scale once you know how much you need it to scale.
Lost in a code jungle
Friday, February 03, 2006
 
 
When I worked for a bunch of oceanographers, the main servers (the ones that did the really really heavy work) were named after oceans, as in Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, etc.

Auxillary servers and workstations were either prefixed with "sea" or a pun on the word. If the name had a negative connotation, it was a server. A positive or neutral name meant it was a workstation. So we had names like Seastorm, Seadragon, Seapirate, Seacucumber, Seawall, Seashore, Seashell, Seanymph, and even... Seesaw and C-3PO.

I haven't been there in five years, yet I can still tell you where the machine was and what it was used for (assuming they were still there.)
TheDavid
Friday, February 03, 2006
 
 
One place I worked I named then after simpson's characters.  Another place I took over the network all the workstations were named after the user of them.  Since half the people had quit since then it was really funny seeing these miss named machines.

Now I just do workstations as WK01, WK02, WK03.... ok not creative but it works and doesn't matter who has the machine.
Lee
Friday, February 03, 2006
 
 
We had machines named after the sound effect bubbles you saw in the old Batman show: Blam, pop, boffo, etc.

Then we got a new sysadmin, and he kept asking "so is your machine Bampf or Splat?"
Chris Tavares Send private email
Friday, February 03, 2006
 
 
Amazingly enough, there's even an RFC on the subject. Check out http://www.faqs.org/rfcs/rfc1178.html

Even more amazing, they discourage using names like Shop1, Shop2, Shop3, Server1, Server2 and so on.
TheDavid
Friday, February 03, 2006
 
 
This post was worth it for that RFC... sorry to be redundant, but not sorry to learn a little something new.
t3rse Send private email
Friday, February 03, 2006
 
 
One printer I use is still named "D4" for Development Fourth Floor even though we've been on the 6th floor for five years now and that printer now belongs to Customer Service. That's why I think location is a bad idea.
NetFreak Send private email
Friday, February 03, 2006
 
 
So according to the RFC, using characters on Spongebob Squarepants should be ok. I guess I'm in the clear.
Turtle Rustler
Friday, February 03, 2006
 
 
My favorite scheme was rivers. Kinda boring, but it makes people hit the atlas to find esoteric (but still spellable) names.
Chris Winters Send private email
Friday, February 03, 2006
 
 
Rocky, Bullwinkle, Sherman, MrPeabody, Boris..

Next one's gotta be Natasha
sgf
Saturday, February 04, 2006
 
 
I name my computer after the user that works on that workstation.

It makes it much easier to give phone support when people are having network issues - nobody has to type in awkward names and it makes it easier to remember which computer is in which location.

Only works on a small scale though.
Ankur
Sunday, February 05, 2006
 
 
I once worked at a us fed agency whose computers were named for pokemon characters (e.g. squirtle).  they tended to be short and easy to remember (kids card game, after all).  One of the bosses decided this was "inappropriate" even though all of the machines faced in and our web presence had more descriptive domain names...this guy's suggestion was to rename them all after chess grand masters...there was a rebellion at the idea of remembering how to spell a bunch of russian names (along with fisher) , and eventually we got astronomical terms.
jburka Send private email
Monday, February 06, 2006
 
 

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