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Stupid Pundit Tricks: Stupid comments on Google Desktop Search

From:
http://www.channelnewsasia.com/stories/afp_world_business/view/111812/1/.html



Joe Wilcox at Jupiter Research said the move by Google could be a threat to Microsoft by making the Windows platform and browser less needed.

Ummm... it runs from the browser. That makes the browser MORE needed. And it runs only on Windows. So, they're doing more to make Windows useful than to make Linux useful.


"Google is shifting the focus away from specific technologies, like Windows, to the greater utility of Web-based information," Wilcox said in a Web log.

Ummm... no.... it's a Windows-based search.

"Google's desktop search tool may run on only Windows, but that's because of the sheer volume of people using the operating system. And that's where Google can fill in search capabilities left out by Microsoft."

So, Google, like everyone else is helping to support the defacto Microsoft Windows Monopoly.



True, Google is POSITIONING themselves to potentially compete with Microsoft. But this current move does nothing but strengthen Windows when compared to Linux. Here is yet another app that is WINDOWS-ONLY.
Mr. Analogy {Shrinkwrap ISV owner} Send private email
Thursday, October 14, 2004
 
 
I appreciate your point of view, and acknowledge that it's diametrically opposed to that of the author of the article, and that his conclusions seem to be wrong because the facts he's spouting are wrong, but did you ever think that there could be some in-between answer?

Google is taking Microsoft on on their own turf - Search related to their own apps. It's kind of like Google saying "You guys are so incompetent you can't even search your own documents well." Maybe they just felt there was no need for a Linux or OSX search tool. And, of course, the development dollars : market share ratio just isn't there.

But I agree, pundits are what pundits are, and just because they exist and pundit doesn't make them right.
www.MarkTAW.com Send private email
Friday, October 15, 2004
 
 
Microsoft has been trying to get people interested in desktop search for years but it has never gained traction until recently.

What Google is offering is a competitor to Apple's "Spotlight" pervasive search. It definitely makes the Windows platform more valuable, especially in light of Microsoft's continued delays to get WinFS out the door, and with Spotlight likely to be much-hyped when it arrives in January. "We have that on Windows too," Microsoft can say, thanks to Google.
Nate Silva Send private email
Friday, October 15, 2004
 
 
Uh...

I've been using DocSearcher*:  http://sourceforge.net/projects/docsearcher/

For over 18 months and it handles most MS documents, OpenOffice, text, html, pdf, and a multitude of other things... and it's Java-based and open source, so it works on Linux.


*  Horribly biased here: I've made some small contributions, deployed this tool at 2 government agencies, friends with the lead developer, did a presentation to my local Linux Users Group on it with the lead developer, and have an unofficial role in the roadmap development.
KC Send private email
Friday, October 15, 2004
 
 
Recalling that MS has $40+ billion in cash, no one takes them on directly unless they want to be:
a. hammered out of existence
b. purchased
c. bankrupt

Google is playing this one right, remembering that algorithms are agnostic.  Once successful they can put it onto _any_ platform _they_ choose. 

So, now we have google search, google mail and google desktop.  Google searches your files and you grab the link to search the web or read your email and suddenly you are in the googleWeb, not a "browser", but a web interface. 

Suddenly the boys at google don't look so stupid...
MSHack
Friday, October 15, 2004
 
 
Doesn't anyone remember the Altavista desktop search too.
non-pundit
Friday, October 15, 2004
 
 
Heh, I've never thought those boys looked stupid. When I first saw their oh so simple home page design I knew they had some brains.
I am Jack's search engine salute
Friday, October 15, 2004
 
 
It appears to be pretty firmly aimed at the home desktop though. For instance, as of now it does not index anything like Exchange Mailboxes, and it doesn't go onto shared drives, etc. (This is probably a damn good thing, and the thought of something trying to spider a coroprate intranet does not fill me with joy). However it does make it not too useful for a corporate desktop, where communications are through Exchange, and most documents are going to be stored centrally, or on Network Drives, etc.
Andrew Cherry Send private email
Friday, October 15, 2004
 
 
Mr. Analogy:

"Ummm... it runs from the browser. That makes the browser MORE needed. And it runs only on Windows."

But it doesn't matter *which* browser. I've been using it from Firefox just fine.

Joe
http://www.joegrossberg.com
Joe Grossberg Send private email
Friday, October 15, 2004
 
 
1. You can be sure this thing will be on linux soon. But as this is a Desktop tool I bet getting it right on Windows is the first priority for the business. Some people I know at Google point out that most (90% ?) of the developers run linux, so you can guess what platform the geeks in Google would rather develop it.

2. I ran this thing at work on my Windows machine (which is basically used for email only, so it didn't get an extensive test) and it managed to pick up all of the messages in outlook - which are stored on an exchange server.

Which gives me an idea - i should try an s/mime encrypted message to see how that is handled - i would hope it is ignored.
Rhys Keepence Send private email
Friday, October 15, 2004
 
 
"Microsoft has been trying to get people interested in desktop search for years but it has never gained traction until recently."

They have been trying this for years, but the products haven't reflected it. There's been FindFast, which everyone turns off and more recently Indexing Service, which has got a crappy UI buried away in an MMC console.
John Topley Send private email
Friday, October 15, 2004
 
 
To Andrew Cherry: I think you can use it with corporate email and in fact, since it only indexes Outlook folders, I think that is the expectation. It is in a business setting where you get such huge volumes of email archived that you need a nice search tool. To be frank, I have found Outlook's built in search facilities less than hopeless, and Google's Desktop Search is wonderful in comparison.

In order to index Exchange mail, you can either have your email delivered direct to your local machine, or you can use the offline folders facility. In my setting where people frequently send 6-10MB attachments, keeping mail on the Exchange server is a no-go proposition. It takes no time at all to exceed the administrators' storage limit.
Ian Send private email
Friday, October 15, 2004
 
 
Ah, I assumed it simply wouldn't index mail in Exchange at all. I run the servers here, as well as developing (we're only a small shop, I have a large hat collection), and all the mail is stored on the servers for archiving and backup reasons. I'll look into it further. So far I have to say it's not that useful to me though. If I search my hard drive for reasonably useful things, I get thousands of matches, most of which is product and api docs in html format. Ah well, i'm probably not the target market yet.

My second point I still consider valid though, which is that in the enterprise, the value of indexing a users work machine is probably small, the value of providing google like search for the network, shared resources, and network shares would be high.
Andrew Cherry Send private email
Friday, October 15, 2004
 
 
--the value of indexing a users work machine is probably small, the value of providing google like search for the network, shared resources, and network shares would be high--

It'll come, don't you think? Google has to be working on some commercial offerings to generate future revenue. After all, with the way that Google is managing to index the whole internet today, indexing the enterprise has to be a snap.
Ian Send private email
Friday, October 15, 2004
 
 
They do offer a network connected device for searching an intranet.

http://www.google.com/appliance/

Maybe a software-only version is on the way.
Rafael de F. Ferreira Send private email
Friday, October 15, 2004
 
 

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