The Design of Software (CLOSED)

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Best UI in a web app

http://280slides.com/

From the UI perspective only, this has to be the best I've ever seen.
Phil
Monday, September 22, 2008
 
 
Looks pretty good. Do you know what it's implemented in?
John Topley Send private email
Tuesday, September 23, 2008
 
 
280slides is built with the Cappuccino framework, which they have open sourced.

http://cappuccino.org/
Ian M. Jones Send private email
Tuesday, September 23, 2008
 
 
I wasn't impressed to be honest. It seemed very slow to load and I didn't like the way the selection handles worked. The toolbar graphics didn't have rollovers.

I'd give it 7 out of 10. It is a good effort, but still a long way to go to make it usable.
Scorpio Dragon Send private email
Tuesday, September 23, 2008
 
 
Also, it is much harder to use an unfamiliar application without context menus. I agree that it is a good start, but still has a way to go.
Anonymous
Tuesday, September 23, 2008
 
 
Yeah, not usable at all. It just locks up half the time. I'm not sure what they are trying to do but whatever it is isn't working for me on IE7. It looks ok but just isn't really functional.
nutso
Tuesday, September 23, 2008
 
 
I must admit that I didn't try the actual app, just looked at the screenshot.
John Topley Send private email
Tuesday, September 23, 2008
 
 
I've found it to be perfectly usable, and I've played with it a fair amount since it was first released a few months ago.  It does want to be run in a browser with good javascript speed -- and any flavor of IE doesn't really cut it.  Try it in Safari, Firefox, or Chrome and it shines.
jburka Send private email
Tuesday, September 23, 2008
 
 
It isn't only a speed issue. It generates recursive Javascript errors when you move the mouse over certain shapes which brings the whole thing to a grinding halt (locks it up).

Any time I use a web application that displays JavaScript errors I just have to shake my head. Why isn't it common knowledge that you need to have the "display a script error" option turned on during development?
nutso
Tuesday, September 23, 2008
 
 
"and any flavor of IE doesn't really cut it.  Try it in Safari, Firefox, or Chrome and it shines. "

And I find that unacceptable until the rest of the world ditches IE and starts using one of the "better supported" browsers. The last time I checked IE was still way ahead on market share. So excuse me if I'm not impressed by an application that doesn't work well (at all) in the most popular browser in the world.  :(
nutso
Tuesday, September 23, 2008
 
 
jburka: "Try it in Safari, Firefox, or Chrome and it shines."

I was using Firefox 2 and it ran like a dog.

The UI is non-standard and looks a bit dated. All a bit of a mess I think.

I don't see where they're going with it. An online clone of Powerpoint might be useful, but only if you didn't need to learn anything new.

As it is, it looks like one of those proof of concept websites that came out in the late 90's to show that everything would soon be online.
Scorpio Dragon Send private email
Tuesday, September 23, 2008
 
 
"I was using Firefox 2 and it ran like a dog."

I had the same results in FF3.  No animated transitions, no kiosk mode, no drawing tools, extremely limited selection of templates and shapes, this is a toy program, not a real office tool.  You could get better results with a WYSIWYG HTML editor and a bit of Javascript to make the pages change. Sure you can import Powerpoint presentations, but the background gets dropped, and every slide is 100% static, you can't get text elements to enter or exit, never mind use fancy fade effects or anything like that. Unless someone can figure out how to make better use of Flash, with authoring of .swf files inside a browser, I don't think the desktop versions of presentation software have too much to worry about.
RGlasel Send private email
Tuesday, September 23, 2008
 
 
"I don't think the desktop versions of presentation software have too much to worry about."

Agreed. I think it is sad that THIS is what people claim is the "best UI in a web app". It is pitiful at best when you compare it to what you can do on a desktop.

What's even sadder is thinking about just how hard they had to work to get such minimal functionality out of a web app.

Heck, they could have chosen to do this in WPF and had a MUCH better application in one tenth the time. And yes, they would have alienated all of those people who weren't running Vista (or XP with .NET 3.0 loaded). But the number of people (all Vista users) who could have run it out of the box with no downloads greatly exceeds the number of people they have ended up alienating because it doesn't run well on their browser of choice. So with WPF they could have had many more happier users. And they could have had a much better program with one tenth of the effort. And the number of users who could run the program without a download will only go up as time goes along.

The web development model is not suited to presentation software. It simply never will be. Choose Flash, Silverlight, or WPF and you'll be much more successful. That's my two cents.
dood mcdoogle
Tuesday, September 23, 2008
 
 
>> what people claim is ...

people claim?

Well, I am not a web guy myself. But I am interested in how much they can push the envelope. This seems more of a research than product development. They've added some OOP extensions to Javascript. Perhaps what's really being developed is Javascript.
Phil
Tuesday, September 23, 2008
 
 
Seems to run fine for me using Firefox 3. Some nice touches like resizing the view when an object goes out of bound. The interface style is in the same style as OS X. It's a web app, so of course it doesn't run like a desktop app. Although if you want web app performance in a desktop app, try WPF.
el
Wednesday, September 24, 2008
 
 
The Live Chess application (allows you to play chess online) on chess.com is pretty slick (no flash or java).
King's Pawn
Wednesday, September 24, 2008
 
 
It looks like copy of Apple's iWork - Keynote:
http://www.apple.com/iwork/keynote/
Shalin Jain Send private email
Sunday, September 28, 2008
 
 

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