The Design of Software (CLOSED)

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What is the backend of 'cloud' server software written in?

anybody know (or have links) about what the software behind web bases client/server software (e.g. GMail) is written in?  C++/Java/python/modules written in whichever works for each module?

I've been looking at the Chrome browser, google gears and the general move to computing as a service.  The front-end/gui is javascript I suppose.  But not very much is talked about the server side.

Reason I am wondering is I am a C++ dev and wonder if there is much future work in C++ client side/desktop apps.  I enjoy working on the gui side of things but have quite a bit of experience with server side.  Are things going to become javascript programmers writing the GUI and something else programmers working on server software, and what is that something else?
not the nonno
Tuesday, September 09, 2008
 
 
According to Steve Yeggie, he used to work at amazon and now works at google, both allow certain languages to be used server side.  The list I remember off the top of my head is C++,Java, Javascript at both, python at google, perl, and lisp at amazon.  It seems to me that Java and asp.net(C# or vb.net) are the two big server side web technologies at the moment.  Sure there is a lot of buzz around ROR and Python but they don't seem to be making the big inroads that MS and Sun have in the server side programming market.
soup
Tuesday, September 09, 2008
 
 
I would love to see you, or anyone else, write a GUI in javascript. I hope you were refering to the logic behind the GUI.

As for server-side, pick a language and it has probably been used.

This may come off as mean but, are you sure you're a developer? A C++ developer, no less. Amazing...
AverageMidget Send private email
Wednesday, September 10, 2008
 
 
AverageMidget: JavaScript is used to write gui's by manipulating a standard object model (ie: effectively an API).  This is really not that different to a VB, C++ or Java app which implements a UI by interfacing with a windowing toolkit.

Your nasty comment was unnecessary and unwarranted.
Frank
Wednesday, September 10, 2008
 
 
AverageMidget wrote
>I would love to see you, or anyone else, write a GUI in javascript. I hope you were refering to the logic behind the GUI.

I was referring to the GUI of an application, not the GUI of the O/S.  The front ends of applications such as those at http://widgets.yahoo.com/ are written in javascript, which call into an engine to do their processing AFAIR (it has been a couple of years since I worked with it).

>As for server-side, pick a language and it has probably been used.

I am more interested in what is currently being used and what people are moving towards.

soup wrote:
>It seems to me that Java and asp.net(C# or vb.net) are the two big server side web technologies at the moment.

Thanks for the response.  This is why I'm wondering about whether I need to get into these technologies. I suppose to a large degree it depends on the application and for the apps that need to do a lot of fiddling with data files (i.e. not db) then C++ may still hold its own?
not the nonno
Wednesday, September 10, 2008
 
 
Yeah, I really have to apologize for that. I was in a really foul mood and was quick to bite. I am truely sorry for my venom.
AverageMidget Send private email
Wednesday, September 10, 2008
 
 
Goran Burcevski Send private email
Thursday, September 11, 2008
 
 
People are "moving towards" whatever is "hot" with the up and coming tweens, because everyone knows that kids who haven't graduated high school know everything and once you're 18 you're so far over the hill we should be putting you on an iceberg and floating you out to sea.

Other people care less about what's fashionable and more about what they are productive with, and knowing what "people are moving towards" won't answer that question for you.

But python, ruby, C#, java, erlang, haskell are all popular with various crowds, so if you know C++ then you're supposed to be dead already along with the rest of the dinosaurs. Although google's map/reduce thing (which is popular with the functional language crowd these days) was actually written in C++ so clearly either they're retarded or there's more to it than picking a language and expecting magic to happen.

Tuesday, September 23, 2008
 
 

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