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.NET tool for new project

I will start a new project in a few weeks, this need be developed in MS .NET.
(please don't reply with python or delphi or R&R or others)

but the question is wich tool is "the best"?

- vb.net 2008
- C#
- .asp??

really I don't know even what is asp.
about vb "a lot of people" warning it about "not proffesional".

I will to select one/two developers, but wich profile will you use in order to develop a new project? experts in traditional vb6? or in vb.net? or in C#? and what is for asp.net?

the project is an business sales +invoicing system control.

I like dialogs used from browsers (without installations), but the ideal would be both dialog ways (windows and browser capable).

So I would like your comments about how to select the tool, where asp is good to use and even if I can use an "free" database as mysql instead ms sqlserver.

I have a msdn subscription, so I will use any of this tools from MS, but which and why?

Thanks in advance,
Guillermo Send private email
Sunday, August 17, 2008
 
 
Well, to answer your specific questions:
1.  You could choose vs.net 2005 or 2008; it's up to you.
2.  I prefer C#, but if it's easier to find vb.net developers in your location, go with them.

This answers dome of your questions, but that probably won't help you.  From the questions you are posing about "asp", you are clearly not qualified to make this decision.  My recommendation is to hire someone who is qualified, and learn from him.
Lyn Thomas Send private email
Sunday, August 17, 2008
 
 
<<you are clearly not qualified to make this decision>

I'm only wondering what is the best way for doing a new project in ms .net, and asking also for the necessity of using asp.net but in vb or C# and then between vs2005 or vs2008.

I can hire an expert MS .NET developer, but not an "decision maker", I need to determine previously if there is "better" vs2005 or vs2008 and vb or C#.

I don't have all the certainty, is for this I'm asking.
Guillermo Send private email
Sunday, August 17, 2008
 
 
You absolutely should not base a hiring decision on minutia such as 2005 vs. 2008. That would be like refusing to hire a taxi driver because you use this year's car and his experience is with last year's. Just because the buttons on the radio have moved around a little doesn't mean he can't drive it right away.

You should choose whether you want to make a desktop application or a web application. Trying to do both, especially in your first software project, virtually guarantees failure.

As for VB vs C#, there is no absolute right answer for all situations. It depends on the particulars. In your case, much of the challenge for whoever you hire will be in managing your expectations, distilling your vision into requirements that can actually be implemented, and teaching you about software development. Been there, done that. Hire a strong developer with business acumen and good people skills, and go with his or her reccommendations.
clcr
Sunday, August 17, 2008
 
 
Delphi 2007 for Win32 :)
Totally Agreeing
Sunday, August 17, 2008
 
 
There is no best way.  If there was, everyone would be using it.

There are just pros and cons and a whole lot of things which depend on your requirements and expectations, and even still, most platforms can be used to build most products, given the use of someone sufficiently experienced with the technology.
Cade Roux Send private email
Sunday, August 17, 2008
 
 
Guillermo,

I misunderstood.  When you wrote:
> I will start a new project in a few weeks, this need be developed in MS .NET.

I thought that meant _you_ would be doing the development. Apparently you are going to hire someone to do the design and coding while you supply the business requirements.  This is a reasonable division of labor.

Worrying about tools is like hiring a house painter based on the brand of paint he prefers.  Find someone who has done similar work, at a price you can afford, and let him make those decisions.

-- Lyn
Lyn Thomas Send private email
Monday, August 18, 2008
 
 
<<Apparently you are going to hire someone to do the design and coding while you supply the business requirements>>

yes,
but some high importance rules of the "design" will be mine also. i.e. "how this function appears and works in detail", "how many options will have the end users in the dialogs" and so on.

I don't want to be forzed to use an "bad tool", for example some developers I've contacted tell me about develop this in php or delphi or VB6 classic and so on.
I need to think also in the maitenance in the future, and the future nobody knows, but If myself will be tented to continue mantenance, or hire other different developer....
Guillermo Send private email
Monday, August 18, 2008
 
 
Since you have already decided on .Net, just take VB.Net or C#.Net. Both are commodity skills for which there is a steady supply.
Try to have a guy that is going to "keep it simple". Maybe I'm biased, but it seems the VB.net community is more likely to go for a simple bread and butter solution. C#.net tends to be more attractive breeding ground for architecture astronouts.

Good luck. You'll need it. I hope you do not take offence, but in my experience people who are so ignorant about the technical side of software as you appear to be seldom run a successfull software company.
Vee
Tuesday, August 19, 2008
 
 
> but the question is wich tool is "the best"?
> - vb.net 2008
> - C#
> - .asp??

"VB.NET" and "C#" are nearly the same - they're different syntaxes of the same languages. It doesn't matter which you choose.

"ASP" (more especially "ASP.NET") is a technology for web applications. Web applications can be written in the C# or VB.NET languages to use the ASP.NET framework/library.

If you're not writing a web application (if you're writing a desktop application) you still use the C# or VB.NET languages but you don't use the ASP.NET framework/library.

> I will to select one/two developers, but wich profile will you use in order to develop a new project? experts in traditional vb6? or in vb.net? or in C#? and what is for asp.net?

Hire someone who knows ".NET programming" (which means C# and/or VB.NET). Hire someone who has a proven ability/experience not only to work but especially to *deliver* as a solo/lead developer (because they won't be getting technical help from you)

> even if I can use an "free" database as mysql instead ms sqlserver.

I think so, or you might use the free "MS SQL Express".

In any case, this is the sort of topic you can/should discuss with whoever you employ.
Christopher Wells Send private email
Tuesday, August 19, 2008
 
 
VS.Net 2008: the newer IDE is always better. I'd suggest Xdevelop for its superior editing/analysis capability, but if you need GUI or Web page designer it's probably not suitable.

C#: better than VB.NET if your developers know how to use these C#-specific features.

ASP.NET: there is no other choice unless your developers are willing to investigate in other frameworks or make their own.
AqD Send private email
Thursday, August 21, 2008
 
 
Guillermo: "please don't reply with python or delphi or R&R or others"

Why not? Delphi does .NET now, in RAD Studio 2007. It does both Delphi for .NET, Delphi VCL for .NET, and C# development (although not WinForms).
Ken White Send private email
Thursday, August 21, 2008
 
 
Chris, Aqd, thanks.

my interest for using mtSql is because there is now some tables in mysql that I need to reuse/update in the project.

MS .NET is an "from top" requirement.
I will need to develop first a pilot because don't sure if end-users will prefer web or winform based.
Guillermo Send private email
Friday, August 22, 2008
 
 
So pick web or winforms and run with it. I suggest letting deployment requirements drive the decision. Your pilot is far more likely to be a success if you do a good job on one interface than a half-assed job on two.

If you try to do both, you'll have to spend twice as much time on the UI. You'll also need to make sure that everyone who works on the project maintains a strict separation between UI and business logic. That's not necessarily hard from a technical standpoint, but it requires a degree of discipline that I've found to be the exception rather than the rule. It's also not well facilitated by the current generation of web frameworks, especially ASP.NET.

Finally, there are going to be deeper architectural differences between the web and desktop versions of your applications. Have you thought through how you will design your data structures to support both the statefulness of the desktop and the statelessness of the web?

Ask yourself how many successful applications you can name that are available in both web and desktop form.
clcr
Saturday, August 23, 2008
 
 
clcr,
thanks very much, You're right with the difficulties of two basic pilot.
Guillermo Send private email
Sunday, August 24, 2008
 
 
I would try python, deplhi, or ruby on rails.
doofusandgallant Send private email
Friday, August 29, 2008
 
 

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