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Installer for Mac

Hi,

I want to port .NET application using Mono to macOS x 10.5 and above.

Has anyone used : http://my.smithmicro.com/mac/stuffitinstallermaker/index.html?im-

in conjunction with Mono Distribution? Pls share your experiences.
CoreSoft Send private email
Tuesday, July 22, 2008
 
 
You're going to get eaten alive by Mac users for using mono/.net and not using native Objective-C and Cocoa.

Good luck with that...
TownDrunk
Tuesday, July 22, 2008
 
 
Thanks,

So according to you, I should develop product on 2 different platforms ? That is grossly expensive and time consuming.

How about Using J2EE ? I am new to Mac but a Pro in both .NET(C# and VB.NET) and Java. So can you share you experience ?

Otherwise I will drop the idea altogether for Mac and let them use some kind of Virtual PC (will provide blog on my site.)
CoreSoft Send private email
Tuesday, July 22, 2008
 
 
Can't comment on Mono, but Stuffit's star is greatly faded since Mac OS 9 days and probably isn't something you want or need to use.

These days Mac apps are often distributed via disk images containing completely self-contained .app bundles that just need dragged to /Applications to install. Otherwise the stock PackageMaker generally does the job:

http://developer.apple.com/documentation/DeveloperTools/Conceptual/PackageMakerUserGuide

See also:

http://developer.apple.com/documentation/Porting/Conceptual/PortingUnix/distributing/chapter_9_section_1.html
has Send private email
Tuesday, July 22, 2008
 
 
+1 to shipping .dmg files.
If you can't do that, use the standard packagemaker (comes with XCode, which is on the OS X DVD, but not installed by default)

WRT to using Mono: Mac users highly prefer products developed using native technologies, that follow all the Apple usability guidelines.  But if your product is more in the nature of a service (that would run on Mac OS X Server), then the UI isn't all that important.
xampl
Tuesday, July 22, 2008
 
 
"You're going to get eaten alive by Mac users for using mono/.net and not using native Objective-C and Cocoa."

_ONLY_ if you are developing a tool that you hope hardcore mac-only developers will use.

Something to loko forward too - there's a growing number of Windows developers writing stuff also for Mac and those people will soon far out number the original "mac-only" hard core developers. Those people (inclusing myself) don't give a damn what the innards are assembled from, as long as it works.

Tuesday, July 22, 2008
 
 
"...will soon far out number the original "mac-only" hard core developers..."

Ya right... How soon will that be? So us Mac users are going to look forward to and accept sub standard applications on the Mac. Good luck selling those applications.
TownDrunk
Tuesday, July 22, 2008
 
 
I'm using java. Fidelity on OSX isn't 100%, but in general the mac users are glad it works on their system and don't complain.

Most of them are developers and can tweak a couple of things if they need to (for example, a shell script).

Incidentally, does anyone know how to create those nifty osx packages without using a mac?
Yanic Inghelbrecht Send private email
Tuesday, July 22, 2008
 
 
Mac OS X comes with a bunch of developer tools, called Xcode, although you have to install them separately from the OS. Xcode includes a document describing the two preferred approaches for creating distributables for your product.

One is the simple .dmg disk image. This is preferred for most products.

The second is a full installer, used when you need to do extra tasks as part of installing. For example, installing fonts. This installer system is also supplied with Xcode.

Read briefly about my experiences with Java on Mac:
http://blog.pokercopilot.com/2008/07/using-java-for-mac-os-x-desktop-app.html
Steve McLeod Send private email
Wednesday, July 23, 2008
 
 
Don't do it - bought it - 32 chars file-name limitation complaint exposed that there is ho further development planned. In the end, I got my money back.

Jon
Jon Burnham
Wednesday, July 23, 2008
 
 
One thing you could try is porting over your underlying layer with Mono but re-writing your UI using Cocoa#. Generally users aren't too bothered about the technologies used underneath, it's what is used for the UI that counts. Cocoa gives you a hell of a lot of functionality which many users expect to be in your app.

If you're going to just port a UI directly from Windows, with no regards to Mac standards and then use an Installer if you don't need one, it just screams "This developer couldn't care less about the Mac, he's just doing this to shut some people up".


"Something to loko forward too - there's a growing number of Windows developers writing stuff also for Mac and those people will soon far out number the original "mac-only" hard core developers."

That will take quite a while, the vast majority of software on the Mac is still Mac only. And most of the reason that developers like me are Mac only is because we just don't see much worthwhile in the development environments on other platforms, plus no major business incentive to switch.

"Those people (inclusing myself) don't give a damn what the innards are assembled from, as long as it works."

So essentially they lazy programmers who have no pride in their work and want to do the least work possible to write an app. You'll be burned alive if you take that attitude on the Mac. If you look at some of the apps being ported to the Mac you'll see that quite a lot of the developers are working hard to make it look and work like a Mac app and their little bit more effort gets appreciated a hell of a lot by Mac users.
Martin Pilkington Send private email
Wednesday, July 23, 2008
 
 
You almost certainly don't need an installer on MacOSX. Very few mac apps have them. Just package it inside a disk image (.dmg).

I wasted a day or two making the same mistake when I started out developing for MacOSX.

BTW if you aren't prepared to put some effort into making it look and behave like a mac app, I wouldn't bother. Just get them to run the Windows version inside Parallels.
Andy Brice Send private email
Wednesday, July 23, 2008
 
 

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