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is mac mini powerful enough for development

we are looking at a possible iphone application
the sdk requires osx to run, and we are a ms shop at the moment

has anyone tried developing on a mac mini, does it have enough grunt (i am looking at the top spec model, with max ram) ? or would i better off to go with an imac

didn't really want to have another monitor on my desk if i can help it

thanks in advance

alex
bumperbox Send private email
Thursday, June 05, 2008
 
 
Maybe - some info here on the 'new rules for buying a mac'

http://www.macworld.com/article/133150/2008/05/macbuying.html
MT Heart
Thursday, June 05, 2008
 
 
I think the current Mac Mini is powerful enough for development of iPhone apps.

A caveat: a friend bought a Mac Mini and tried using a non-Apple keyboard and mouse. The system was unstable until he bought an Apple keyboard and mouse.
Steve McLeod Send private email
Thursday, June 05, 2008
 
 
Yes.  I'm doing it now.  (well, okay, not now; now I'm at work with a C# project in Visual Studio fired up).

I have a Mac Mini 2.0ghz core 2 duo with 2gb of RAM, driving a 24" monitor.  The dev tools are fine on it.
jburka Send private email
Thursday, June 05, 2008
 
 
(in response to that last comment, I should add that I've had both PPC and Intel mac minis and both worked perfectly well with my Microsoft Natural keyboard and my logitech wireless mouse)
jburka Send private email
Thursday, June 05, 2008
 
 
Depends entirely on the kind of development you do. I used one for about a year /  year and a half for development before the 2 gb ram limit just became too painful. But, that's in part because I am typically running about 4 vmware images at the same time...

If you are just using it as a typical development machine, it is probably fine. And, the Mini is great as a simple drop-in server -- say as your svn repository, iterative build server, etc.
minis are sweet.
Friday, June 06, 2008
 
 
>> And, the Mini is great as a simple drop-in server -- say as your svn repository, iterative build server, etc. <<

Mine is a 1st gen PPC Mini, and it's great as a iTunes server, general file server (with external 1TB drive), Time Machine backup target (using the 1TB volume for this), and SVN repository.
xampl
Friday, June 06, 2008
 
 
I just switched last week - from having one box with Linux and one with WinXP and a switchbox - to a Mac Mini with Parallels and all kinds of development tools on it. Works great! And I have a Microsoft Entertainment Wireless keybord connected and it works just fine.
Andy H Send private email
Saturday, June 07, 2008
 
 
I'm on a 1.83GHz iMac with 2GB of RAM as my dev machine, and besides the RAM being too limiting for having Xcode, Photoshop and Safari open at once (along with about 20 other apps) it's fine as a dev machine. More power does mean compiling will be faster, but in general a Mini will be fine. And in all my time on the Mac, I haven't encountered a problem with 3rd party keyboards and mice, at least not USB ones.
Martin Pilkington Send private email
Saturday, June 07, 2008
 
 
You might be interested in this http://shopmatrox.com/usa/products/datasheet.asp?ID=788
It allows dual monitors on a mac mini, or anything else with only a single VGA.
I can't image a single headed dev machine.
Martin Send private email
Saturday, June 07, 2008
 
 
Mac Mini is fine.  It's not going to model the weather or decipher a genome for you, but it's perfectly adequate to build code on.

I don't like OS X as a work environment, so I used to run my Mini headless and remote-desktop into it from my PC, which worked beautifully.  More recently I've given it a monitor and I use Synergy to control it (that's a really slick software KVM thing -- supports copy-and-paste between computers and so on, and it's free!)
Iago
Sunday, June 08, 2008
 
 
As long as you have lots of memory, it's fine. The disk is a laptop-y one, so slow, but that's rarely a problem in practice.

About the keyboard/mouse problem, I've never seen that. I use mine with a Microsoft wheel/optical mouse and an IBM Model M keyboard (through a USB converter) with no trouble.
Robert Synnott Send private email
Thursday, June 26, 2008
 
 

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