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Where are the Win32 components?

Ever since .NET hit the scene, I have noticed an explosion of .NET components, widgets, etc.

But Win32 has been around for longer before .NET and I can't seem to find anymore people sharing/selling Win32 components, widgets, etc.

Where did it all go?

I'm looking for this stuff and it seems to just dissapeared!  Did people just drop it like a rock?  Heck, give it to me, I'll use it!  :)
Sebastian Dwornik Send private email
Tuesday, March 04, 2008
 
 
There is plenty of need for Win32 today!  But many companies like to follow Microsoft around hoping for scraps to fall from the monsters slimy mouth.  Anyone see Cloverfield?  ;-)

<Hint>

Win32 components, frameworks, libs, etc. are a great niche market for a mISV.

</Hint>
LL Send private email
Tuesday, March 04, 2008
 
 
Win32 isn't a component framework or even modular... how could there be widgets? Or do you mean MFC widgets maybe?
Bill
Tuesday, March 04, 2008
 
 
"component framework"?

What's the difference?  It all boils down to a collection of .DLL libraries and controls (ActiveX perhaps).
Sebastian Dwornik Send private email
Tuesday, March 04, 2008
 
 
Maybe it's different definitions -- to me Win32 is the collection of C-style functions and sometimes function callbacks you use to interact with Windows. ActiveX (COM components) aren't Win32, and DLL libraries only give you a list of functions you can call. Or maybe that's what you're considering a widget? A collection of functions that does something? As opposed to an embeddable object you can put in a GUI? The latter is what I consider a "component."
Bill
Tuesday, March 04, 2008
 
 
There are alot of Delphi components available.

ActiveX market isn't booming like it used to, but there are still components available.

There are MFC Add-On libraries still available.

I would seriously consider Delphi/C++Builder if you do alot of Native development.
Nate Send private email
Wednesday, March 05, 2008
 
 
+1 for Delphi.

I'm seriously thinking about switching back to Delphi from C#. If it just wasn't so expensive...
fh
Wednesday, March 05, 2008
 
 
i do a lot of delphi development. it can be scary ... way back when, m$ said some windows services in the future will only be accessible via COM (see the task scheduler, no direct api that i know of for that). that stuck me with no option but to use COM for some things. i worry in the (near) future they'll do the same with .net ... the only way to access some feature of windows will be through .net. of course, i realize that delphi can compile .net, but i really hope they keep the api open and available for regular dll calls.

-don
Don Dickinson Send private email
Wednesday, March 05, 2008
 
 
Prof-UIS http://www.prof-uis.com, CodeJock and others are still very active. Then there are sites like http://www.codeproject.com/ which has heaps of Win32 controls and libraries.

Commercial library companies have moved to .Net as that is the latest, greatest thing where dev's will spend money to get a leg up.
Neville Franks Send private email
Wednesday, March 05, 2008
 
 
Codejock (www.codejock.com) has some ActiveX, and MFC components that are still being developed as well as .Net stuff.

I would think real hard before investing time in learning Delphi at this point. Take a look at the below O'Reilly post on current book sales. If you know it then definitely use it but I wouldn't invest in it at this point.
http://radar.oreilly.com/archives/2008/03/state-of-the-computer-book-mar-23.html

The numbers are not just for O'Reilly, they are retail sales covering most major outlets. The numbers for Delphi: 137 books sold in 2007. In comparison Python 46,000 and C# 232,000. No, I didn't leave the thousands off of the Delphi number.
You're not paranoid if ...
Thursday, March 06, 2008
 
 
Almost down there with the dying duck REALBasic.
Codger
Thursday, March 06, 2008
 
 
>+1 for Delphi.
>
>I'm seriously thinking about switching back to Delphi >from C#. If it just wasn't so expensive...

Good luck with that.
IPC
Friday, March 07, 2008
 
 
fh: "I'm seriously thinking about switching back to Delphi from C#. If it just wasn't so expensive..."

If you're switching back, and you registered your previous copy (actually, even if you didn't register), you're entitled to upgrade pricing. That makes the Pro Edition of the full RAD Studio 2007 product (Delphi for Win32, Delphi for .NET, C++ Builder, and C#) about $400 US. I don't know about you, but that's only about four hours of my time.

You're not paranoid if :"Take a look at the below O'Reilly post on current book sales."

Yeah. Base a major business decision on a post on a fairly obscure publisher's website. Good business plan.

Marco Cantu already rebutted O'Reilly's link at marcocantu.com. So have dozens of other people.

And besides... Delphi makes you so productive you don't need books. ;-)
Ken White Send private email
Monday, March 10, 2008
 
 
"Yeah. Base a major business decision on a post on a fairly obscure publisher's website. Good business plan."

It's a valid plan for the job hunter. Go to dice.com, careerbuilder.com, monster.com, etc., and count how many Delphi jobs there are.

They might be 3.

The only thing Delphi has going for it is you can ship your app without a runtime. But once the .Net runtime is on every machine, there will be no need to worry about it.
anony
Thursday, March 13, 2008
 
 

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