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Platform independent languages

Other than Java, which other languages are platform independent. Which one to use for today's web requirements and which one facilitates easy integration with databases.
RK Send private email
Thursday, July 26, 2007
 
 
Perl, python, and ruby, for starters...
BenjiSmith Send private email
Thursday, July 26, 2007
 
 
Which one is best, Python or Ruby? I am not sure, but heard somewhere that Microsoft is about to connect Python with .NET Framework
RK Send private email
Thursday, July 26, 2007
 
 
Best according to which criteria?
John Topley Send private email
Thursday, July 26, 2007
 
 
Database Connectivity, easy learning curve, powerful
RK Send private email
Thursday, July 26, 2007
 
 
"Database Connectivity, easy learning curve, powerful..."

I'd echo BenjiSmith's suggestions except possibly replace Perl with PHP (which originally was derived from Perl). ColdFusion is a good choice. ASP.NET using VB or C# is slightly more difficult but on a par with Java and JSPs.

For websites with database backends, it's like asking a painter whether he wants to use a horse hair brush, a camel hair brush or one with synthetic fibers. It's largely a matter of personal preference and there's no one language that's head and shoulders above the others.

If you want to guarantee yourself a job and still want to be platform independent, then Java/JSP is the best choice overall. Technical merits aside, it's arguably the most mature and widely adopted web programming language that meets your criteria.
TheDavid
Thursday, July 26, 2007
 
 
IIRC, basically all of them except .Net are pretty platform independent, but with Mono, even portions of .Net are there.  Of course, some things run better on particular os's due to permissions, configurations, and documentation.
KC Send private email
Thursday, July 26, 2007
 
 
Java.

You said other than Java, but it had to be said.

Java.

There.  I said it again.
OneMist8k
Thursday, July 26, 2007
 
 
Both python and ruby are now "first class" .Net langauges, IronPython is possibly a little more mature.

My experience is that ruby is great if used with rails to generate the sort of web site that it was designed for.

Python is a more useful general purpose programming langauge, a sort of readable Perl. It does have a couple of excellent web content systems Django and zope are probably the most popular.
Martin Send private email
Thursday, July 26, 2007
 
 
I'm not sure if you'd consider C++ to be platform independent, but since you can make a C++ project which compiles for Windows, Linux and Mac I guess it technically is. Not that I'd recommend it, especially for a web project.
John
Friday, July 27, 2007
 
 
Why do you need platform independence with your web app?

Or are you planning on selling the web app?

As long as you run on either IIS or Apache, you have the two major targets covered.  Most of the other platforms don't have enough traction to worry about.

And with either of those, you can use ASP.Net, PHP, Perl, etc.  It's just a matter of finding the right tools.
Eric D. Burdo Send private email
Friday, July 27, 2007
 
 
That's a good point.
John
Friday, July 27, 2007
 
 
RK:
"Which one is best, Python or Ruby?"

Neither. They're practically identical, as far as semantics is concerned.

Personally, I prefer python syntax. And the python runtime is a little faster than the ruby runtime.

But, really, it doesn't matter. Anything that can be built in python can be built in ruby, and vice versa.
BenjiSmith Send private email
Friday, July 27, 2007
 
 
Echoing the comments above, any of those languages will work. My personal leaning would be towards either Python or Ruby.

I think Python is more mature. Because of this, there are more frameworks for it, a wider body of knowledge, and a better runtime (it's faster and less quirky than Ruby's).

Ruby, on the other hand, is generating a lot of buzz these days. I find its syntax to be more expressive and, in an unquantifiable way, more fun. It is slower than many of the other languages (although not less scalable - there's a big difference) and has a few quirks in its Windows runtime (it is developed on OSX). The Ruby web framework, Rails, is very good and makes working with a database very easy.

I'm trying to keep the comparison balanced, but I'm more of a Ruby guy than a Python guy, so I'm not doing a good job of it.

Either Python or Ruby will work. There are huge sites built with each. It is a matter or personal preference. I'd download the runtimes for each and do their intro tutorials. You'll probably have your mind made up by the end.
Eric Marthinsen Send private email
Monday, July 30, 2007
 
 

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