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Deploying relational database and webserver on consumer device?

Anyone ever done this?  It feels VERY icky. :)
Crimson Send private email
Wednesday, April 11, 2007
 
 
The "icky feeling" might come from the type of device you're using...
KC Send private email
Wednesday, April 11, 2007
 
 
Someone reportidly has hacked the AppleTV to run full blown OS X, which means you definitely can put a relational database and web server on a consumer device.

In fact, I think a lot of car modders would be very interested in this - you can install one in the space for your radio and wirelessly stream songs from your iPod to your stereo system and back. They could do it with the Mac Mini but the Mini's form factor made installation a tad more difficult.

Anyhow, like KC said, it really depends on the device.
TheDavid
Wednesday, April 11, 2007
 
 
You might want to read Circuit Cellar Ink. More than a couple items advertised, and written up in articles included running a minimal web server from a microcontroller with only a few K of ROM. There are commmercially available embeddable web servers that are less than 1 inch square. Buy 1, buy 1,000,000.
Peter
Wednesday, April 11, 2007
 
 
Why not?  If the device is powerful enough for TCP/IP it can do HTTP, too.  SQLite has very light footprint.
Jeff Zanooda Send private email
Wednesday, April 11, 2007
 
 
I've been involved in a project that in its test phases was deploying SQL Server on flash disks.  Icky.  The guys writing the database code used enough SQL Server features that rewriting for Oracle 8i Lite, Jet, whatever was a too time-intensive a proposition.  But we went roundy-round on what to do about the database for a while anyway.  If it survives, it's probably on something more sensible now.

On the flip side, one of today's popular free lightweight databases would be kind of nifty on just about any OEM board that supports enough of an operating system for one.  Or on something like a linksys slug.  Dunno how you'd handle sensibly keeping your writes to the flash disk minimized, though.

I started doing a bit of pointless unproductive google bricolage comparing thttpd vs lighttpd, sqlite vs firebird, etc. before I realized, yes, you could do that, and no, I don't have a use for it yet.
Brent Send private email
Sunday, April 15, 2007
 
 
Maybe it feels icky because it's not right in your particular case. Or maybe you just aren't seeing why it is the right thing in your case.

While I'm sure there are a lot of good reasons to put a db and a webserver on some embedded platforms, it probably often happens because it's the most obvious solution from someone's point of view and they get to do some clever coding.

I don't believe in reinventing the wheel but I do believe in ensuring that the software comes close to suiting the platform. Too often we choose software that's easy to use because we're familiar with it while forgetting the differences between past applications and the new one being considered.
Rob Send private email
Wednesday, April 18, 2007
 
 

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