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Open Source Java and reducing JRE size

Hi,

After recent events in Java world and new licensing,

Can I use a tool like Rejar (http://rejar.sourceforge.net/) to strip JRE and ship it with my product (GPL)?
Tom
Saturday, December 02, 2006
 
 
You'll be effectively forking Java here.
Bean
Monday, December 04, 2006
 
 
Keep in mind the java.* and javax.* packages can only be loaded by the bootstrap classloader, while your application classes are loaded by a more-restricted classloader.  Furthermore, packaging your application with a stripped-down JRE may limit how well it can be integrated into other code (or, conversely, how easily other code can be integrated into it).
Angstroem
Monday, December 04, 2006
 
 
I'd have thought (subject to it actually working), the simple answer to this is yes.

It raises an interesting question as to whether you need to license your application under the GPL!
Arethuza Send private email
Tuesday, December 05, 2006
 
 
I have a commercial desktop application written in Java/Swing.

Usually I ship a copy of JRE with it.
That's not good, because:
- my application is 2M in size
- JRE size is 70M when unpacked and 12M when packed.

So I have setup.exe which is 12M + 2M = 14M.

14M is too much for a regular user to download.

So I want very much to cut those 12M to 1.5M (I already tried, it works!) and ship this cut version of JRE.

Can I do this legally according to GPLed Java?
Tom
Friday, December 08, 2006
 
 
Yes, but not until Java 1.7 IIRC. Java 1.5 remains restricted, and I'm not sure about 1.6 but I think it does too.

Why not have your installer detect Java and download it if not found?

Sunday, December 10, 2006
 
 
That is the thing. I don't want to install "public" JRE.

I need a private copy of JRE - just for my application, inside its "C:/Program Files/MyApp/jre" directory.
Tom
Wednesday, December 13, 2006
 
 
I actually did this a few years back.

I don't know if I broke the law or not, but the main thing is not to interfere with the system Java files, i.e. install a local copy of the JRE.
.
Jimmy Jones
Wednesday, December 13, 2006
 
 
Ok, I can have a local copy of JRE.

But, keeping in mind Open Source Java, can I cut it and throw out all stuff that my app doesn't need (classes, dlls) etc. - like I described in the beginning of the topic.
Tom
Saturday, December 16, 2006
 
 

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