The Design of Software (CLOSED)

A public forum for discussing the design of software, from the user interface to the code architecture. Now closed.

The "Design of Software" discussion group has been merged with the main Joel on Software discussion group.

The archives will remain online indefinitely.

Qt compared to .Net

I need a simple GUI that will read a file and display its contents in a datagrid and save as a spreadsheet.  Its for a program that can be downloaded as an enhancement to World of Warcraft.

I'm looking at using Qt because its very pretty, intergrates into Visual Studio and applications can be made with only 4MB of dlls.

C#.Net has the same benefits, looks slightly less nice in my opinion and requires a .Net download if the user doesn't already have it.  I've never used C#.

Its worth saying that WoW players downlaod at least 30MB of patches every month.

Has anyone used both?  What is it like learning and how easy is it to make the framweork work?
Patrick Kirk Send private email
Tuesday, November 14, 2006
 
 
I play World of Warcraft on my Mac and at present, neither solution would work for me. I realize it doesn't directly help you make a decision, but in all fairness, I don't think we need a pretty GUI;  all we need is some way of clicking something and getting a CSV file as a result.

That said, I believe Qt does have OS X support. I'm just not sure if Visual Studio "enables" that support. WxWidgets may also work for you, and I tend to hear that recommendation more often than Qt.

C#.NET has no easy to install counterpart/framework on the Mac.
TheDavid
Tuesday, November 14, 2006
 
 
Hi David,

A CSV is what I start with, then the UI will allow you select bargains or whatever from a datagrid then inject the chosen ones into an ingame shopping list that interacts with the Auction House.  The code generating the CSVs is in C++ with STL - it needs to launch and run in under 3 seconds on 25MB files so that was a no brainer.

My big question is which is easier to learn to program or are they roughly equivalent.

Qt looks fine on OSX - not sure what percentage of WoW players have Macs though.  If you have a link that throws light on that please do post it.
Patrick Kirk Send private email
Tuesday, November 14, 2006
 
 
I wish I knew of a link; Blizzard doesn't publish that information and to be fair, the only way they can even guess at the ratio is to watch how often certain files are downloaded on patch day. Even that metric is of limited value due to the use of torrents. That said, I would estimate somewhere around 5 to 10% are Mac users.

If you can conceive of a way to do this in game (with Lua), then it shouldn't matter. I think Auctioneer does allow you to watch for specific bargains and flags them accordingly, but I've never heard of anyone being able to selectively choose and bid.

If you're determined to go the route you've chosen (and I admit there are valid reasons), I would prototype your AddOn in C# to see if there's any interest in managing your auctions offline. Once you've done that initial beta testing and worked out all of the issues, then rewrite it using the Qt libraries to expand your "market".

Keep in mind that the Burning Crusade is going to change quite a few things in the API and you do not want to spend a lot of time wrestling with the fine details at this point.
TheDavid
Tuesday, November 14, 2006
 
 
Why should it be used instead of MS Excel + proper template?
curious
Wednesday, November 15, 2006
 
 
From what I understand, he's creating a tool that takes a marked-up Excel worksheet and translates that into in-game commands.

In other words, if the prices (within the game) are such that you should buy approximately 40 different items, and sell 30 other items, you can indicate those actions on the Excel spreadsheet, then go into the game and click one button as opposed to doing 70+ clicks.

Conceptually, this is no different than an eBay auction management tool.

Given the rash of gold farmers on World of Warcraft, I think this is a genie-in-the-bottle scenario but if he solves the technology problem, his solution could be applied to several other gameplay issues.
TheDavid
Thursday, November 16, 2006
 
 
Qt is very good, buts its quite expensive if you are buying a commercial licence.

Are you sure its worth the headache to do it cross platform?
Andy Brice Send private email
Friday, November 17, 2006
 
 
Qt is only $600 so I bought it.

so ar, its easy and it makes fast executables.
Patrick Kirk Send private email
Friday, November 17, 2006
 
 
Patrick,

How did it cost you $600? It looks like the costs are much higher based on this page:

http://www.trolltech.com/products/qt/licenses/pricing
Cymen
Saturday, November 18, 2006
 
 
Oh, now I see the small business deal. So was it $600 for one, two or three platforms? And which version of the product?
Cymen
Saturday, November 18, 2006
 
 
You're *total* percentage of Mac users out there is in the low single digits. You percentage of Mac Gamers is probably about less than half of all Mac users. How out of the many Mac Gamers play WoW? I don't know, but you can count on it being a pretty low number.

My advice would be to get something out there with what you know, then worry about Mac/Linux users later, if you even get a lot of requests for it... Personally, I try not to encourage people to use the Mac at all because I dislike it so much that I'd never want to be stuck having to use it in order to make programs for it.

Just my two cents.
Wayne B
Sunday, November 19, 2006
 
 
Oh and for a simple little utility like this, I wouldn't touch .Net with a ten foot pole. Just use straight C++ and either the raw Win32 api, wxWidgets or MFC/ATL if you know it.

For a real quick GUI, I'd use VB6 for the gui layer and C++ for anything that VB6 can't do. The VB6 runtime is only 1mb zipped...
Wayne B
Sunday, November 19, 2006
 
 
Thanks Wayne but I had never done any GUI programming before and MFC is way harder than people make out.  As for the Win32 API, it also is very hard.  For example, the code to populate a combo box with 10 drop downs from a text file is huge.  In Qt, its just one little routine.

Qt and .Net both offer the same fuctionality to me as a newbie developer.  Sit at PC, take 2 hour tutorial and start drawing forms.  My particular application needs to start up fast so I preferred C++ to C#.
Patrick Kirk Send private email
Tuesday, November 21, 2006
 
 

This topic is archived. No further replies will be accepted.

Other recent topics Other recent topics
 
Powered by FogBugz