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An obvious feature...

Why haven't they implemented this yet, dammit?

Word is capable of changing the case of selected text, but this can only be done through an obscure dialog hidden deep inside the bowels of the menu bar. Why the fuck can't I select the first letter of a word, press Caps Lock, and have it be capitalized? OK, so one letter is easy, but what if it's an entire selection?

I know for a fact it would be incredibly useful, and it's an obvious feature to have. It's in my user model. ;)
Flasher T Send private email
Wednesday, December 08, 2004
 
 
You want to be able to easily capitalize an entire section?

I can't remember ever wanting to do that.  ALL CAPS IS HARD TO READ AND LOOKS LIKE SHOUTING.  Doing this *should* require a bit of work, since it's not really part of the normal writing process.
John Senior Send private email
Wednesday, December 08, 2004
 
 
Not so much an entire section - although I've often had to capitalize a word. But very often I have a text where some of the words need to start with capitals and don't, while others don't need to start with capitals and do.

A feature like this would also make it easy to do this with a macro (the texts are usually structured).
Flasher T Send private email
Wednesday, December 08, 2004
 
 
Because the PURPOSE of the CAPS LOCK key is to put everything AFTER you press it into CAPS. 

Its PURPOSE is NOT to make something you've already typed into UPPER CASE.  That would be a mis-use, or a hijacking of the purpose of the CAPS LOCK key.

The results of mis-use or hijacking purposes tends to be confusion for the user -- IF the user can figure out what happened in the first place.

It sounds like it would only be obvious TO YOU.

Sorry about the rant, it's early, traffic sucked, and I haven't had my coffee.
AllanL5
Wednesday, December 08, 2004
 
 
If the user is selecting text to overwrite it with something in Caps, there is no reason why they cannot do it once the existing text has been capitalized.

In fact, I'd be perfectly happy if they made it a feature that's disabled by default so it doesn't bother most users.
Flasher T Send private email
Wednesday, December 08, 2004
 
 
I'm guessing they don't do it because they already have a simple keyboard shortcut that accomplishes the same thing.
SomeBody Send private email
Wednesday, December 08, 2004
 
 
Just add the "Change Case" button to your menubar.

I had the problem that I would past all caps, or all lowercase words into a document and I didn't want to go back and correct the case.  So I just highlight the text and click "Change Case" until it comes out right.  It cycles through 'all uppercase', 'all lowercase', and 'mixed case'.

To add the button, you need to search for it in the Customize menu under "Format".


That fixes the problem without having to change the meaning of a standard key on the keyboard.
Jared
Wednesday, December 08, 2004
 
 
Control-Shift-A.
Kyralessa Send private email
Wednesday, December 08, 2004
 
 
Haven't noticed this before, but OP is right. The functionality of changing cases for a selection should be in the menu, not in a sperate dialog. It *is* an action, isn't it?

And the dialog looks like an option dialog with this - well - option buttons ;-). When I invoked it - for the very first time actually -, I started thinking for several seconds if this would change all my text or just the text I'm going to write after applying a change. While of course it does none of it
Gerd Riesselmann
Wednesday, December 08, 2004
 
 
I think the problem is that Caps Lock is a toggle switch, like a checkbox. You don't expect it to DO something when pressed; it should just change its state and wait for something else to happen that it can affect.

Also, if you wanted to capitalize more than one block, you'd have to select the first block, hit caps lock, de-select the first block, hit caps lock again to turn it off, then select the second block.

A "change case" submenu when you right-click would do the trick. EditPlus, my favorite Windows text editor, has this.
JW
Wednesday, December 08, 2004
 
 
But then we could argue that _any_ feature that changes formatting for a block of text belongs on the context menu.  Who draws the line, and who decides which features are common enough to be there and which aren't?

However, that said, Word has:

Cut, Copy, Paste, Font, Paragraph, Bullets and Numbering, Hyperlink, Synonyms, Select Text with Similar Formatting, and Translate.

Some of those choices seem quite silly, particularly if I'm just selecting a couple of words instead of a whole paragraph.  There's certainly room for improvement here.
Kyralessa Send private email
Wednesday, December 08, 2004
 
 
Has anyone actually ever used Translate?
Flasher T Send private email
Wednesday, December 08, 2004
 
 
"LOOKS LIKE SHOUTING."  It does not look like shouting.  How about I shout at you and you tell me if that looks like all caps.

Some usenet weenie somewhere forever branded the all caps post shouting.  I thoroughly hope his tombstone reads RIP
Caps luvva
Wednesday, December 08, 2004
 
 
I never have.  So I tried "This is just a short test sentence to use the Translate function" and chose to translate English to French.

And I got...

"(No suggestions.  Try looking up a single word at a time, or use Translate via the Web.)"

Color me underwhelmed.


By the way, ALL CAPS IS HARDER TO READ than mixed-case because ALL CAPS lacks the ascenders and descenders that lower-case letters have.  That's one of many reasons it's frowned upon.  It should be used sparingly if at all.
Kyralessa Send private email
Wednesday, December 08, 2004
 
 
It doesn't do it because that's not what it does. Think of Don Norman's edict - one action per button / one button per action. Using Caps Lock in this way degrades what Caps Lock does, and next time I hit it, I won't know what to expect. Perhaps I've accidentally highlighted a character.
www.MarkTAW.com Send private email
Wednesday, December 08, 2004
 
 
"Think of Don Norman's edict"

Think of the E32 BMW 7-series' console. ;)

Like I said, they could make it disabled by default. Even if you've highlighted a character with the intention of typing over it, Caps capitalizing it won't be a problem for you.
Flasher T Send private email
Wednesday, December 08, 2004
 
 
Now if you said Control-Caps Lock, then I might be with you there.  Since Control-Caps Lock doesn't do anything, you wouldn't be breaking anything by adding it.

Oddly enough (or not), though you can customize the keyboard in Word, you can't customize the Caps Lock key there.  Nor Control-Caps Lock, for that matter.
Kyralessa Send private email
Wednesday, December 08, 2004
 
 
Control-Caps-Lock makes no sense, Caps-Lock is a toggle.
Simon Lucy Send private email
Wednesday, December 08, 2004
 
 
So is CTRL, so it all works out.
www.MarkTAW.com Send private email
Wednesday, December 08, 2004
 
 
Alternatively you could highlight your text and then use the current keyboard shortcut - shift + F3.  This certainly works for the UK edition of Word.
a cynic writes... Send private email
Thursday, December 09, 2004
 
 
Control-Shift-A is a toggle too; what's your point?
Kyralessa Send private email
Thursday, December 09, 2004
 
 
CTRL + SHIFT + A is not a toggle.

Has the average IQ around here gone down about 20 points?
www.MarkTAW.com Send private email
Thursday, December 09, 2004
 
 
Wait, let me take that back. CTRL + SHIFT + A is a toggle in Word (why, I don't know). I still think the average IQ around here is 20 points lower than it was a month ago.
www.MarkTAW.com Send private email
Thursday, December 09, 2004
 
 
ctrl + shift + A toggles between all caps and whatever it was previously.

shift + F3 toggles between all caps, all lower and title case (initial caps if you must).

Which I've found slightly more useful.
a cynic writes... Send private email
Friday, December 10, 2004
 
 
I was meaning toggle in the keyboard sense.

Control is a modifier it sets a bit.

Caps Lock is a keyboard toggle that continuously sets a bit unless overridden by the Shift key modifier.

The combination of keys may be a software toggle, but I wasn't referring to that.
Simon Lucy Send private email
Friday, December 10, 2004
 
 
But I still don't see your point.  Pressing Caps Lock, and for that matter Control-Caps Lock, can be tested for like anything else.  If Control-Caps Lock were the toggle for all caps, presumably it wouldn't also toggle the state of Caps Lock.  So why is it a problem?
Kyralessa Send private email
Friday, December 10, 2004
 
 
it's not an *implementation* problem unless your keyboard has a mechanical caps lock key (like old macintosh and other apple computers)

it's a usability problem. users are taught 'caps lock is a sticky modifier which alters how the keyboard works'. you're now overloading it to mean 'except sometimes, when it changes the text you've already typed'. good luck explaining that one!
mb Send private email
Monday, December 13, 2004
 
 
We were speaking of Control-Caps Lock, not plain Caps Lock.
Kyralessa Send private email
Tuesday, December 14, 2004
 
 
Ok, so two modifiers together....

Ever used multiple keyboard layouts? alt-right-shift (or some such) is the typical switch-layout key. damned confusing sometimes, since those keys should just effect an accelerator or some such.
mb Send private email
Thursday, December 16, 2004
 
 

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