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Overcoming boring feeling

I get into this a lot..after initial enthusiam at a start of a project,after a month or so,I start to feel bored,and dont find anything exciting.And,this leads to slowdown,and sometimes I dont get done any work.Have you experienced suchfeelings? How do you overcome it,especially if you are a lone developer? I enjoy learning new things and implementing them.On this project I have successfully implemented Model-View-Pattern(ASP.Net 2.0) and also,used NHibernate for the first time.
desperateforsolution
Wednesday, October 11, 2006
 
 
Think of the weirdest, most interesting career you could get involved with.  Then combine that with your technical skills.  Don't limit yourself to being a techie all your life, unless you want to go through this boredom cycle for 40 years.
tell me more
Wednesday, October 11, 2006
 
 
"I want to be.. a Lion tamer"
Andy Send private email
Wednesday, October 11, 2006
 
 
Programming isn't for you then. Find another career.
Love what you do or get out
Wednesday, October 11, 2006
 
 
Boredom after the initial excitement of a project, any project, is very common.  I would say it's almost human nature.  Think of all the New Year's resolutions that are forgotten a week or two after they're started in early January.

Many people, including myself, experience a boredom after the initial exhiliration of a new project.  It's an illusion.  The boredom is just a way of avoiding work on the project, now that it's gotten past the stage of easy excitement and you're having to grapple with the tough stuff.

The solution:  buck up and get to work.  I know it's easier said than done, but I believe that's what you've got to do.  Work on the project even though you don't enjoy it right now.  Once you immerse yourself and make some progress you should get into the flow again.  Make a commitment to get 1, 2, 4, or more solid hours of work in on the project each day.  Make sure you focus on things you're getting done, so you can give yourself a pat on the back.  Avoid thinking too far ahead to tough pieces that you haven't gotten to yet.
Herbert Sitz Send private email
Wednesday, October 11, 2006
 
 
"Think of the weirdest, most interesting career you could get involved with.  Then combine that with your technical skills."

I'm pretty sure that this just plain doesn't work.  Anything you do, no matter how exotic or interesting it may seem at first, can turn into drudgery if it becomes a job.  Not saying it will for all people.  But the people who not find it drudgery are people who can also find satisfaction in more mundane jobs. 

That is, if you're a person (like most people) who gets excited about a project and finds yourself bored after you've gotten through the initial stages, the solution is not to find a more exciting project.  You're going to experience the same letdown after the initial phase no matter how exciting the project.  Buckle down and get back into the project you have in front of you.  Otherwise you'll waste your life fooling yourself into thinking that the "grass is greener" somewhere else.
Herbert Sitz Send private email
Wednesday, October 11, 2006
 
 
I like to move one of the "want-to-do" items on the to-do list up above all of the "supposed-to-do" items to help rekindle the interest.
Ben Bryant
Wednesday, October 11, 2006
 
 
You have two choices.

1) You can make work fun.

2) You can separate work from fun, and accept that work basically pays or is preparation for fun. Kind of like spending all week working on your hot rod so you can go drag racing on Saturday.

I'm in the same situation and I (ahem) don't need to work so option 2 is right out the window. So ultimately, I'm looking for a new job that's fun first and pays the bills second.
TheDavid
Wednesday, October 11, 2006
 
 
Hi,
Herbert,you r rite..i need to spend time..and keep moving..
thks
desperateforsolution
Friday, October 13, 2006
 
 
I'd say to quit software and find a new, more fulfilling career.

If I was an employer, I'd generally want to absorb the disruption, short term lost productivity and learning curve of new technologies if that cost provided enough benefits in terms of long term increased developer productivity, lower staff turnover, obsolete/unsupported old versions.

In general I'd be happiest when people are using proven tools and techniques they understand and have been successful with in the past. That would seem to optimize developer productivity and reduce risks. So I'd usually be somewhat hesitant to embrace new technology just because it's new and some developers like to be always learning new technology.

I'd recommend to use your time away from work playing around with the new technology you like and use work as a way to finance that hobby.
cbmc64 Send private email
Friday, October 13, 2006
 
 
MT Heart
Saturday, October 14, 2006
 
 
My friend was a garbage collector. He found it boring. It was sometimes exciting to learn a new garbage route, or learn about a new model of garbage truck, but the feeling soon faded. Finally I told him "You don't have passion for your field. Garbage collection isn't for you then. Find another career. What do you find interesting, what do you really find exciting?" And he said that medieval french literature always held an interest. So the next day he went out and got a job as an expert in medieval french literature and he's never been happier!

I tell you, it's important to do the thing you are most passionate about.
Meghraj Reddy
Sunday, October 15, 2006
 
 
Sounds to me like you're working on projects not for the end result, but for the interesting bits of work you get to do while building them. So you do the interesting bits, then you lose interest when all that's left is the boring stuff. What you need to do is work on a project that you are doing *for* the end result and not so that you can have some fun coding cool things that exercise your brainteaser muscles.
Nathan Ridley Send private email
Sunday, October 15, 2006
 
 
"My friend was a garbage collector. He found it boring. . . . So the next day he went out and got a job as an expert in medieval french literature and he's never been happier!"

You've got to be kidding me.  What world are you living in?  (Well, maybe your friend was a garbage collector in first place because he couldn't find a job with his literature Ph.D.  There's lots of that going around.  But that's hardly relevant to OP's situation.)

Taking a bit from the "silver bullet" idea that Joel has been talking about, I'd say there generally is no "silver bullet" like finding the perfect job that's going to solve a boredom problem. 

Yes, I know there are all those books like, "What Color is Your Parachute" and innumerable people telling you to "do what you love".  And I'm not saying there's nothing to that.  But people need to realize that finding the right job will not magically solve all your problems.  Life is tough, even when you're doing something you love.

In some ways the advice to switch jobs to something else that excites you more reminds me of someone advising a friend whose marriage has grown stale to get divorced and find a new mate who is more beautiful, exciting, understanding, etc.  In almost every case, that is not the answer.  If the excitement was there in the beginning, the problem that it has gotten boring lies not so much with the spouse (or in our OP's case, with the job), it lies in the person who gives in to boredom.  Just about anything can be interesting and exciting if you resolve to make it that way.  Especially something that you originally found exciting.   

And if I'm sure of anything it's this:  in most cases the cure for boredom is not to switch to something that excites you more.  That is just a temporary fix; the boredom will return.  The real solution is to decide whether the job that you say is boring you is a job you really want to do.  If it is, then you resolve to do it, despite the boredom.  If you do that, the act of doing the job will draw you in, you will become re-engaged, the problem with boredom will diminish.

Also, boredom is certainly not simply a problem with mundane jobs.  I remember a friend who was a lawyer at a prestigious law firm.  He had plenty of work, a wide variety of interesting cases.  He  lamented to me one day about how all of his cases over the years were melding together in his mind.  It all seemed like more and more of the same.  The problem with boredom is not one that's intrinsic to a particular job.  It's one that originates in the person who's bored.  Study some zen.
Herbert Sitz Send private email
Sunday, October 15, 2006
 
 
Hi Herbert,
you are very rite..i think I am lacking 2 qualities..resolve to finish and persistence.Boredom is an excuse.And what is this zen you speak about..
desperateforsolution
Tuesday, October 17, 2006
 
 
Hi Herbert,
you are very rite..i think I am lacking 2 qualities..resolve to finish and persistence.Boredom is an excuse.And what is this zen you speak about..

desperate... --  Don't get too down about it, it's something that just about everyone feels to some degree.  The reference to zen probably wasn't that helpful, but zen is a Japanese variant of Buddhism that focuses on attention and mindfulness to the simple things in life.  Turns out that when you pay close attention to just about anything it becomes engaging and interesting, the boredom disappears.  That's part of why I'm saying that switching to something more exciting is probably not a solution.  Buddhist solutions start "from where you are."

There are lots of threads on JoS forum about what to do when you're bored, depressed, not getting much work done.  I think some of the best advice is to force yourself out to get exercise, even if you don't feel like it.  This gets your body going and, as some say, is a "natural antidepressant."  In any case, the counterintuitive result is that by exerting yourself more, you'll find you have more energy and a better outlook.

Others have also suggested a number of self-help books.  These can be helpful too, I think.  Some good ones are "Zen and the Art of Making a Living", "Getting Things Done", "Six Pillars of Self Esteem", "Constructive Living".  Those may or may not be enough to get you going again.  But they be some help, and some insight into your problem.

Besides exercise, just getting enough interaction with other people can also be a big help.  And talk to someone about your problem, whether it's a friend, family member, or therapist.  There are lots of people, myself included, who struggle with being productive.
Herbert Sitz Send private email
Tuesday, October 17, 2006
 
 
thks Herbert
desperateforsolution
Wednesday, October 18, 2006
 
 
This comment is so boring I can hardly be bothered to finish typ
YawnMan
Wednesday, October 18, 2006
 
 

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