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Linux and Virtual PC 2004

Has anyone run Linux in Virtual PC 2004 (pref RHEL 3/4 or SuSE/OpenSuSE 10/10.1).

Did it work as intended?

Any input?

- Nate.
Nate Send private email
Monday, October 09, 2006
 
 
Hi Nate

I've used RedHat in VPC 2004 before, with no problems. Mostly to test and play with Linux on my laptop, and a bit for the geek factor. I've never used it for any production environment or long-running business.

I've also used Knoppix in a VM, though again just to see if it worked.

I've found that on all my VM's, a separate hard disk works best. Since I primarily use a laptop, I've got an external hard disk just for VMs (and mp3s)

Oh, and it goes without saying, the more physical RAM, the better. Though for just exposure to Linux, I've gotten by fine with 192 or 256 on the VM.

I'm loading up Fedora Core 5 tonight, for the purposes of hosting a test database, and I'll reply back if there's any snags or noteworthy .
Achilles Send private email
Monday, October 09, 2006
 
 
Yes. MANY Linux distros work on Virtual PC. Here is a partial list:

http://vpc.visualwin.com/

Also, be sure to check out the Virtual PC Guy's Weblog for tips.

http://blogs.msdn.com/virtual_pc_guy/default.aspx
Turtle Rustler
Monday, October 09, 2006
 
 
Remember that Linux runs very well in vmware, whihc can also run the same virtual machine on a windows or linux host,  vmware is now a free download.
Martin Send private email
Tuesday, October 10, 2006
 
 
Um, no, VMware PLAYER is a free download, but it's crippled: you can't set up new virtual machines in it. VMware SERVER is a free download, but that's designed for running, well, SERVERS. VMware WORKSTATION, the VMware equivalent to VPC, most certainly is not a free download.
Iago
Tuesday, October 10, 2006
 
 
Iago: The free VMWare Server will quite happily run desktop operating systems.
Richie Hindle Send private email
Tuesday, October 10, 2006
 
 
The only real difference between ws and server for developers is that you can't do the clever snapshot branching in server, but disk space is cheap enough just to copy the entire virtucal disk.

Server can be left running with the gui disconnected to do long builds - but you can minimize ws or virtual pc anyway.

AIFIRK server doesn't support sound.
Martin Send private email
Tuesday, October 10, 2006
 
 
Hi Nate

One extra hint:
I'm certain that it's in the links TurtleRustler provided, but if you want to use DVD iso's with VPC, you'll have to first mount them on the host machine using a virtual cd emulator. Then VPC will "see" the dvd as a physical drive.

I've had good success with the one from Microsoft:
http://download.microsoft.com/download/7/b/6/7b6abd84-7841-4978-96f5-bd58df02efa2/winxpvirtualcdcontrolpanel_21.exe
Achilles Send private email
Tuesday, October 10, 2006
 
 
Both vmware and VPC, I believe, will let you mount the ISO's directly to the virtual drive in the VM, so you don't have to mount on the host using the ISO driver.  Go ahead and download the ISO driver, though, if you don't already have it -- it's handy to have around.
D. Lambert Send private email
Tuesday, October 10, 2006
 
 
"Um, no, VMware PLAYER is a free download, but it's crippled: you can't set up new virtual machines in it. VMware SERVER is a free download, but that's designed for running, well, SERVERS. VMware WORKSTATION, the VMware equivalent to VPC, most certainly is not a free download."

Creating new virtual machines is very easy, with several third party tools to do it, as well as the http://www.easyvmx.com/ site.
Brian Mitchell Send private email
Tuesday, October 10, 2006
 
 
Personally, for most needs, I think cygwin is enough.

Alternatively, an actual linux machine should be used, it's trivial to install many distros onto a system, in a multi-boot environment. (Just share the /home and swap partitions, and you're set).

You may even be able to simply chroot into the other systems, "testing" them.

Finally, for those who actually want to run actual distributions, say, for product testing purposes, I'm keeping my eye on the Xen hypervisor, which seems very impressive.
Arafangion Send private email
Tuesday, October 10, 2006
 
 
"Finally, for those who actually want to run actual distributions, say, for product testing purposes, I'm keeping my eye on the Xen hypervisor, which seems very impressive."

Xen has a lot of promise, because the performance is stellar, and with hardware-assisted virtual machines, you won't be locked out of proprietary operating systems that don't explicitly support xen.

Routing io to guests seems like such a nicer way to do things than creating virtual hardware, and all the performance implications that requires.
anonymous for this one Send private email
Tuesday, October 10, 2006
 
 
Hi D.Lambert

Generally, I agree that VPC 2004 allows mounting ISO's directly. That's how I usually go.

There is a size limitation, I think it's 2.2GB. I've had 3.6GB ISO's fail to mount directly, but worked fine using the virtual cdrom driver.
Achilles Send private email
Tuesday, October 10, 2006
 
 
I want to use Xen, I really do, but then it always tells me that I need dedicated partitions for each virtual machine.  Why can't I just use a file? That rules it out for anything I use VM's for.
Grant
Tuesday, October 10, 2006
 
 
>Why can't I just use a file?
Not an expert on Xen but my understanding is that it is a Hypervisor rather than a virtual machine app.

Basically while Vmware/VirtualPC run on top of an operating system as a user level app, Xen is intended to be between the machine and all operating systems.

Currently Xen still requires Linux as a host and so could use a linux filesystem but it is aimed at a much lower level and ultimately will be below all the other operating systems rather like the BIOS in dos days.
I assume it will absorb linux to do this ( or linux will absorb it - depends on your point of view ).
Martin Send private email
Tuesday, October 10, 2006
 
 
Xen does not require a dedicated partition, but it will perform much better with one. Something like the following has worked for me:

disk = ['file:/path/to/virtual/disk,sda1,w']

Obviously, this applies only to domU and not dom0
Brian Mitchell Send private email
Tuesday, October 10, 2006
 
 
"Currently Xen still requires Linux as a host and so could use a linux filesystem but it is aimed at a much lower level and ultimately will be below all the other operating systems rather like the BIOS in dos days."

More than just linux is supported for dom0. I know netbsd is, and freebsd may be by now. I use it on netbsd myself (i dont touch linux).
Brian Mitchell Send private email
Tuesday, October 10, 2006
 
 
"... VMware WORKSTATION, the VMware equivalent to VPC, most certainly is not a free download."

"Creating new virtual machines is very easy, with several third party tools to do it, as well as the http://www.easyvmx.com/ site. "

VMWare Workstation is $189.  At least consider the tradeoffs.
AFTO Send private email
Saturday, October 14, 2006
 
 
VMWare is the best virtual machine manager available, in my opinion. It runs in both Linux and Windows, and can host all modern Linux and Windows operating systems. Performance is excellent.

I've been using VMWare Workstation for years, and I beleive it is well worth the $189 price tag.

You can get a trial of VMWare Workstation for 30 days to try out. That's how I got hooked :)

Saturday, October 14, 2006
 
 

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