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PHP frameworks for dynamic website dev

I've just begun looking at some of the PHP frameworks out there.

Here's my shortlist:
http://www.symfony-project.com/
http://cakephp.org/
http://framework.zend.com/
http://www.codeigniter.com/

I've also looked at ROR, but am planning on sticking with a PHP based framework, as I have more experience with PHP.

I'm curious if anyone in the JOS community has had any experience with any of the frameworks in deploying dynamic sites for clients.  Feel free to comment or share your thoughts of the frameworks listed above, but I'm really interested in whether anyone has had success in building and deploying a production quality website. 

So many of the tutorials and information out there regarding "frameworks" focus on building simple web apps (ie. how to build a: blog, to do list, etc.), and not necessarily websites. 

Also, should I be looking at a CMS (mambo, joomla, etc.) instead of a framework. 

I do custom website development for smaller companies and have traditionally built sites based on customer requirements.  I'm able to use some of my own "libraries" I've built up over the years, but in most cases the requirements don't allow much reuse. 

I'm looking to speed development and make maintenance easier.  Is a framework a good way to go? 

Thanks.
Fred Smith Send private email
Monday, August 07, 2006
 
 
I've used/been on projects that used Joomla, Mambo and PostNuke (not all at once!) to build/deploy dynamic client websites.  We found PostNuke harder to configure and customize, but we had good success and happy clients with all of them. 

> Also, should I be looking at a CMS (mambo, joomla, etc.)
> instead of a framework. 

That really depends on what you're trying to do.  I'm probably going too far to say that if you can configure a CMS your way to ~90 percent of what the client needs AND you can create custom modules for the rest of it, you're better off going that way.  The CMS's are set up to incorporate custom modules... but these are somewhat constrained in that they have to fit in to how the CMS looks at the world... but, then, you have the same issue with frameworks.

In any case, best of luck.
Pat Morrison
Monday, August 07, 2006
 
 
Maybe you should look at CMS more closely as the previous poster said that you can basically code/create almost 90p% of the required site. I've been playing with Drupal for the last couple of months now and their latest version 4.7 is really great. Have a look at www.smallbizhelpdesk.info as this is the one I put up using Dru pal (www.drupal.org).

One advantage of CMS is that they can help you get sites up and running very quickly and at the same time allow you to include your own customisations. HTH.

Cheers,
Phillip
Phillip Flores Send private email
Monday, August 07, 2006
 
 
I'm biased, but if you're basically looking for a CMS+some other stuff, I'd go with Drupal.  The theming and module systems are pretty easy and flexible.

If you're looking to build something from the ground up, I'd suggest you check out QCodo (Qcodo.com).
KC Send private email
Monday, August 07, 2006
 
 
The important point is to understand what do you need.

If you want to make a dynamic Web site with an admin back-end, go for a CMS. You can check http://www.cmsmatrix.org although those mentioned above (except PHPNuke) are also worth checking. If you're going for a simple news-based site, I'd recommend to take a look at http://www.solucija.com/home/snews/ or even a blog engine like http://wordpress.org with plugins.

OTOH, if you need to set up a complete Web application, you'll want to look into one of the frameworks you mentioned, because CMS's are usually too focused to be of much help here. On the other hand, frameworks are usually too generic, sometimes to the point of being unusable (except perhaps by their creators).

In any case, don't look for a universal solution that will magically create of Web app out of nothing; expect to roll up your sleeves and get on your knees and grease your hands to make thinks work, whatever framework you decide upon.
Berislav Lopac Send private email
Tuesday, August 08, 2006
 
 

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