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PostgreSQL vs. MySQL vs. Leading Giants

How reliable and trusted are the open source databases for mission critical applications?

As for MS SQL Server and Oracle, you can get support and there are a lot of user forums and books where one can find help.

From the ever-increasing pressure from open source community, the big giants are releasing Express Editions that are free to develop and deploy.

How far MySQL and PostgreSQL can compete with a donated money.
K Send private email
Friday, May 05, 2006
 
 
I am not sure about PostgreSQL, ut back when we had looked at distribting MySQL with a product, it was going to cost about $100 per seat.  And Oracle started offering a lite version for about the same price.  But you are right, now Oracle and MS both have free versions.  Microsft's MSDE has been free to use in commercial apps for a long time. 

In the last few years MySQL has really expanded and now provides most ifnot all of what the big boys give.  It will be interesting to see if this continues, and if MySQL is going to adopt anything like the SQL Server Express where your stored procedures can be written in .NET instead of T-SQL.  They probably won't, but it will be interesting to see if they address this to the users.
SteveM Send private email
Friday, May 05, 2006
 
 
Google use Berkeley DB for user accounts and settings:
http://www.sleepycat.com/customers/pdfs/cs_google_1005D.pdf

MySQL is the main database on Linux distros nowadays, with more and more Mail Servers and such servers using it. Yahoo use MySQL for some readonly operations and I guess they use it for other tasks as well.

Berkeley DB and MySQL are part of the infraestructure, I would say, so they need to be stable.

PostgreSQL does not seem to be a primary option for infraesctructure of the system, but it's one of the best for new developments, like websites and webapps. It's stable as well.

Firebird is the new kid on the block, but it's a nice-have.

SQLite is too simple, but hey, simple things rock. SQLite sooner or later might become a very good option.

The leading giants have been adapting to the new times, and they are lucky that it's so hard to support different databases in the same application.
Lostacular
Friday, May 05, 2006
 
 
And they are lucky that it is so hard to switch. A lot of us are working in environments where changing the DB would mandate a complete rewrite.
I think this might actually be quite a big cost advantage who start NOW, without being held back by a lot of legacy code.
Fritz Huber Send private email
Friday, May 05, 2006
 
 
They are not lucky that it is hard to switch or support multiple databases.  It is on purpose that it is so hard.  That is how they keep their customers.
XYZZY
Friday, May 05, 2006
 
 
PostgreSQL runs the entire .ORG registry, last I heard.
Chris Tavares Send private email
Friday, May 05, 2006
 
 
"They are not lucky that it is hard to switch or support multiple databases.  It is on purpose that it is so hard.  That is how they keep their customers."

This sort of talk is nonsense. If all rdbms's complied preciesly to the SQL standards, then there'd only be one, wouldn't there. If there were all the same then they'd all be the same.

All this 'database independence' stuff is tosh. The precise reason that you choose database x instead of database y is because it has features or a pricing structure or a development model that you want. So use those features.
bah, humbug
Friday, May 05, 2006
 
 
I've used both MySQL and PostgreSQL and they both seem stable and well performing.
dot for this one
Saturday, May 06, 2006
 
 
The Dutch municipal population register is beeing completely rewritten in Open Source software.

They use PostgrsSQL for databases, they bought support from a German company. It will be a distributed system with local and central replicated storage.

The software will be platform independent, because municipalities use all kinds of servers, from windows to unix to AS/400 to mainframes.

There is a very interesting migration scheme that will take some years to complete :-), but I think the whole operation looks sound.
Erik Springelkamp Send private email
Saturday, May 06, 2006
 
 
"If all rdbms's complied preciesly to the SQL standards, then there'd only be one, wouldn't there."

Which is why there's only one standards-compliant C++ compiler.

No, precise standards compliance does not mean everything must be the same.  You can still compete on performance, price, support, UI...
Iago
Saturday, May 06, 2006
 
 
FWIW, Oracle recently acquired Berkley DB, as well as InnoDB (storage engine for MySql).
BillT Send private email
Saturday, May 06, 2006
 
 
The "Tim Oreilly's Radar" series recently issued a series of "Database war stories" that you'll find interesting.  Mostly about MySQL databases.

What's the cost to you if you lose or misfile one data item in 10,000?  If you're a catalog for store or craigslist you can live with that.  If you're doing financial transactions for credit card payments or PayPal or Bank of America or the Stock Market you can't.  Based on the web buzz (what could be more scientific?) the most reliable system is Oracle.  Postgresql is close to Oracle in reliability.  MySQL is less reliable but faster.  Your milage will vary. Object in mirror is closer ...
Fred Seltzer Send private email
Sunday, May 07, 2006
 
 
IMHO, arguing about different databases alone is going nowhere.

You can have the best software in the world but if you have a bad developer or DBA it will run like cr@p.
D in PHX Send private email
Sunday, May 07, 2006
 
 
All I'll say is PostgreSQL may not be as "hip" and "cool" as MySQL, but in terms of reliability and "real database" features, it is far better than MySQL.

If you dont care about your tables crashing all the time and if you dont care about referential integrity, transactions, date handling, or any other thing that a real database can offer then by all means go with MySQL.  But if you do care about these things then Postgres or a non-free database is your only solution.
Cory R. King
Sunday, May 07, 2006
 
 
There is little need to be inflammatory about MySQL. There are countless examples of sites using MySQL that are not experiencing "tables crashing all the time."
Cymen
Monday, May 08, 2006
 
 
PostgreSQL has excellent support for stored procedures; including being able to write them in things like Perl and Ruby.

If you're doing a lot of SP, PSQL's your choice.

MySQL still beats it for speed, if you're after high-volume data in and out.

Oracle is the choice if you want really exotic scaling and system linking. None of the OS options have that level of support yet, but to be fair very few customers /really/ need it..
Katie Lucas
Monday, May 08, 2006
 
 
Am I the only here who sees MS SQL server far far ahead of the competition because of:
- ETL natively included
- Stored procedures in .NET

What could be more usefull than not to have to script to move and transform data?
Sevenoaks Send private email
Monday, May 08, 2006
 
 
"...What could be more usefull than not to have to script to move and transform data?"

You still script to move and transform data in stored procedures - you're just using a different "language" to do so, with its own risks and rewards.

I like SQL Server because of the Excel like user interface; I can very quickly correct bad data that somehow makes it into the database. However, most other databases have similar interfaces available - Oracle has TOAD.

As others pointed out, asking whether MySQL is better than PostgreSQL is a lot like asking whether Eclipse is better than NetBeans.

Ultimately, you have to define what is mission critical to you, and then proceed from there.  Wikipedia for example, has decided that MySQL fits its needs best.  Despite that ringing endorsement, it may not fit your needs.
TheDavid
Monday, May 08, 2006
 
 
"Am I the only here who sees MS SQL server far far ahead of the competition because of:
- ETL natively included
- Stored procedures in .NET"

Not to mutate this but, stored procs using the CLR blow.

They blow very large chunks. The only, and I assure you, only reason to use .net /clr in SQL is because MS is discontinuing the extended procs.

All the other 'benefits' given (like string manipulation/intensive math) shouldn't be done in a database in the first place.

That aside, I use SQL server and can definately recommend it (but not for it's .net integration).
D in PHX Send private email
Monday, May 08, 2006
 
 
The "Oracle vs. MSSQL" debate can get into a matter religion quickly.  I'd only like to say -- both work exceedingly well :)

Now, if you're talking free (or relatively free) stuff, I'd recommend PostgreSQL over MySQL for anything beyond a 5-table database.  And if you're going to have just 5 tables, don't bother to research -- _anything_ will work.

And one special remark to the person who mentioned that "the internet is full of sites running MySQL whose tables don't crash and burn": care to mention some of those sites that use substantially more than 5 tables, with the largest one slightly over a megabyte?

Sheesh... Ever since this Internet thingy, way too many people have gotten used to the concept that a database is just a server-based version of Excel.  Well it's not.
Kamen Lilov Send private email
Friday, May 12, 2006
 
 
"way too many people have gotten used to the concept that a database is just a server-based version of Excel.  Well it's not."

+1 Kamen!
D in PHX Send private email
Sunday, May 14, 2006
 
 
PostgreSQL and MySQL are a lot more than fancy gui-less Excel implementations...

We run PostgreSQL in production, but we have an intranet installation with a connection pool of around 20 concurrent connections, 40 or 50 tables, the largest being in the order of a million or so rows... lots of constraints, NO stored procedures.

It works great.

Seems to me I would always start with PostgreSQL or MySQL unless I had to support a distributed database environment.
Phill Send private email
Monday, May 15, 2006
 
 

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