The Design of Software (CLOSED)

A public forum for discussing the design of software, from the user interface to the code architecture. Now closed.

The "Design of Software" discussion group has been merged with the main Joel on Software discussion group.

The archives will remain online indefinitely.

Oracle Application development

Looks like I will have to supervise Oracle based project
on high level (i.e not as e developer, more like business owner, project manager kind)

I think I undestand the power of Oracle (i.e it is not just RDBMS, but powerfull Application server, RAD development tool (Developer/Designer)) and I kind of like this.

I can  not , however, escape  the feeling that all apps I have seen so far , developed with Oracle tools, look very old-fashioned in terms of UI.

Can somebody, who is familiar with Oracle dev tools explain why is that and if any ways to make Oracle application look and feel better?
Seemore
Wednesday, May 03, 2006
 
 
=================
I can  not , however, escape  the feeling that all apps I have seen so far , developed with Oracle tools, look very old-fashioned in terms of UI.
=================
I work on such an Oracle app.  Designer/Developer are powerful in that they allow easy app development if you follow the rules and don't try to do anything too fancy.  They will generate the UI with little fuss, but it is nothing specail to look at.  Its almost a VB for Oracle...

=================
Can somebody, who is familiar with Oracle dev tools explain why is that and if any ways to make Oracle application look and feel better?
=================
However, the lates Oracle (10g) provides Java (JDevloper) and I would think the developement of modern UIs (Web based even) should be feasable here.  But I haven't played with it yet, so don't know for sure.
Honu Send private email
Wednesday, May 03, 2006
 
 
Oracle Application Express has a nice look to it -- all template driven. JDeveloper produces a good-looking application also.

I trust that you'll be providing all your developers witha copy of Tom Kyte's latest book?
David Aldridge Send private email
Wednesday, May 03, 2006
 
 
Most of the Oracle applications that you have probably come across before have been developed with our old user interface components - UIX.  This is still widely used for customisation and extensions of the Oracle applications suite.

For bespoke J2EE applications however, we're now pushing JSP/JSF on the frontend - and our own component library ADF faces.  These are much more modern looking, up-to-date and standards driven.  In the Oracle space they are commonly used as part of ADF with either Toplink or ADF BC as the persistance layer.  So far, I'm finding this a fairly nice framework to work with.

I was surprised to hear the comment above about Application Express.  I would strongly urge you to look at this technology - it's very slick and deceptively powerful for CRUD web apps.
Oracle Consultant
Wednesday, May 03, 2006
 
 
Thanks for the useful comments so far. I really appreciate them.

Just one clarifcation. This project is not WEB Based.
Seemore
Wednesday, May 03, 2006
 
 
>> This project is not WEB Based.

Is there a reason why it couldn't be?
David Aldridge Send private email
Wednesday, May 03, 2006
 
 
I guess 90% of the functionality is quite data-entry intensive stuff
Seemore
Wednesday, May 03, 2006
 
 
If it's going to be old fashioned client-server stuff, Oracle Forms and/or PowerBuilder are still around, and they do a nice job putting a front end onto an Oracle Database.
Steve Hirsch Send private email
Wednesday, May 03, 2006
 
 
I'm guessing your application will be deployed just to Win desktops. If you're using Oracle Forms, if you or your programmers poke around the Forms desktop install directories around the examples, you'll find some of the windows specific stuff is actually very nice and looks just great alongside your regular Win desktop apps.

It's been about five years since I've done anything with forms/reports, but I do recall it fondly. While it is designed to be a cross platform client [which may be behind some of the stiffness you may have observed], Oracle does provide Win specific support and features you can use to do a very polished looking Win application.
cbmc64 Send private email
Wednesday, May 03, 2006
 
 
I just developed a nice frontend for a oracle database in netbeans (java). I was really easy and looks fine.

Or are you talking about a IDE that also creates SQL and so on?
Martin Schultz Send private email
Sunday, May 14, 2006
 
 

This topic is archived. No further replies will be accepted.

Other recent topics Other recent topics
 
Powered by FogBugz