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Another word for "Wizard"

I am creating a few "wizards" in our software, but we want to avoid using the word Wizard.  What other name could be used to describe a "goal-oriented series of tasks":

Assistant?
Guidescreen?

...others?
Not-A-Wizard
Monday, March 27, 2006
 
 
Oh, there are PLENTY!!!

Task-Orientated-Window-Wizard-Free-Assistant

Taskifier

Dohicky

Thingamajig
John D Send private email
Monday, March 27, 2006
 
 
Got these from a synonym dictionary on-line

Coach
Director
Guide

I like assistant also
Deborah Miller Send private email
Monday, March 27, 2006
 
 
"...but we want to avoid using the word Wizard."

Why?  Every Windows user knows what the term "Wizard" means.  They don't know what a Director, or a Coach, or an Assistant, or a GuideThingy, does.  Therefore you will have to explain it to them, and you will just screw that up because you don't think like a user (otherwise you wouldn't have suggested a change to a ubiquitious name). 

Users know that when they choose the "Thingy Wizard" they will get a tool that guides them through their Thingy setup.

The wheel has already been invented for you here, and everyone already knows how to use it.  Your changing the words will do nothing but confuse your users.
Karl Perry Send private email
Monday, March 27, 2006
 
 
Magi, Mage, Magus, Magician, Sorcerer, Enchanter, Warlock, Necromancer, Conjurer, Diviner, Mahatma... etc.
newby
Monday, March 27, 2006
 
 
If the wizard doesn't ask a lot of questions (preferably just one or two), then "macro" works just as well.

Best example: Excel. Around here, people consider wizards to be "super complex macros with all the bells and whistles."
TheDavid
Monday, March 27, 2006
 
 
We had someone translate our app into French once and we demoed it to a bunch of people in Montreal featuring our "Account Opening Witch".
NetFreak Send private email
Monday, March 27, 2006
 
 
Assistant.  Guide.  Script.  Configuration Handler.  ConfigSetter. Aid.  Config Aid.  Aid Program.  Aid Script.
AllanL5
Monday, March 27, 2006
 
 
> Every Windows user knows what the term "Wizard" means.

Really? I don't think so. I've always thought the term "Wizard" was a stupid name for it, and I think only power users know what a wizard is.

I think the basic Aunt Marge user would be much more comfortable with something called the "Setup Assistant" than with something called the "Setup Wizard".
BenjiSmith Send private email
Monday, March 27, 2006
 
 
WEeeeeee'rrrrrrre off to see the Wizard...the wonderful wizard of Oz....
John D Send private email
Monday, March 27, 2006
 
 
Interview
Scot Send private email
Monday, March 27, 2006
 
 
<<TASK_NAME>> + "Automator
Nick Hebb Send private email
Monday, March 27, 2006
 
 
Just call a wizard a wizard.  Making up redundant terminology doesn't help anyone.
Artad Gobeski
Monday, March 27, 2006
 
 
Isn't the term "Wizard" copyright/patent/trademark or something by MS?
LesC Send private email
Monday, March 27, 2006
 
 
I vote for assistant
ILoveFortran
Monday, March 27, 2006
 
 
Benji, just because your aunt Marge will be more comfortable with a different terminology than tens of millions of Windows users have seen over the past 15 years, doesn't make it a good idea for one lone developer to tilt this windmill.

Wizards are a VERY familiar metaphor, and virtually anyone who has used Windows knows about them.  Or their uncle Bill has, and if they haven't then he is the one who will be helping them.  So if not them, then Bill needs to be able to use something familiar.

Again: don't reinvent the wheel.  Be creative somewhere else that really matters.
Karl Perry Send private email
Monday, March 27, 2006
 
 
"Wizard" is MS standard, and that's a good reason to stick with it, but it's really a crummy metaphor. What's so wizardy about it? To a user, how is it any more magical than anything else a computer does? It seems in some parts of the the Linux world, they used the term "Druid," which in even crummier, leading Gnome to adopt "Assistant." I'd consider that a superior metaphor to "Wizard" or any other synonym.
Michael Zuschlag Send private email
Tuesday, March 28, 2006
 
 
An 80% efficient solution that is in use for tens of millions of users (the term Wizard) is far better than a 99.9% efficient solution that only ten users know about.

Good or not, the term "Wizard" is known and familiar.  Same as flaps in airplanes, cleat in sailing, and many other terms that on their face may not make much sense but given history are entrenched.
Karl Perry Send private email
Tuesday, March 28, 2006
 
 
Why do you have to use any special term for it? Can you just call it what it does, e.g. Import Data, Check Connections, etc.? Who cares that it's a wizard?
JW
Tuesday, March 28, 2006
 
 
Just because tens of millions of Windows users have used wizard interfaces doesn't mean they know that the interface is *called* a "wizard".

<Shrug>

I don't think it matters. Because I think users will just answer the questions in the dialogues, regardless of whether it's called a wizard or an assistant or a cheese sandwich.
BenjiSmith Send private email
Wednesday, March 29, 2006
 
 
Wizzard

Or Rincewind.

Or "ohshitohshitohshitimgoingtodie"

SCNR.

Dan.
Daniel Send private email
Wednesday, March 29, 2006
 
 
Helper.
Astrobe
Wednesday, March 29, 2006
 
 
Tim.
Chris Nahr Send private email
Wednesday, March 29, 2006
 
 
+1 for "Helper"
David Aldridge Send private email
Wednesday, March 29, 2006
 
 
Call it: "That set of message boxes that you usually just keep hitting 'Next' without reading"
John Goewert Send private email
Thursday, March 30, 2006
 
 
I agree that wizard is the standard thing to call it, as for translating to french or another language, presumably you wouldn't just use a literal translation of all of the words and would use whatever the appropriate word is for the desired language.
Zach M.
Friday, March 31, 2006
 
 
I was going to say "Helper". Now I have to make up something strange and original, like "Lift".
David Hilberg Send private email
Friday, April 07, 2006
 
 

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