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Functional and Technical Specification Training

I have searched the web for training specifically on spec writing, both functional and technical and have not found any.  Has anyone attended training that covers both and if so, information and details would be great.
Renee Galligher Send private email
Wednesday, December 21, 2005
 
 
What level of training are you looking for?

Are you looking for the equivalent of a MBA, emphasis in Requirements Management, or simply some guidelines on how to jot down specs (to illustrate the two extremes)?

Incidently, if you're looking for something formal, it's probably under "Requirements Management" or the parent category "[Software] Project Management".  Searches for functional and technical specifications are likely to show you the end results, not the process itself.
Anonymous Coward
Wednesday, December 21, 2005
 
 
Former COBOL Programmer
Wednesday, December 21, 2005
 
 
You'll probably be taught a lot of overly complex and officious mumbo jumbo that will make it hell for anyone who has to work on the project. Just the division of functional and technical says big process.

Just say no.

Read a book on agile requirements instead.
son of parnas
Thursday, December 22, 2005
 
 
Regardless of whether you do "agile" requirements engineering or not, you'll need to learn how to write "good" requirements.

The reasons we use "overly complex and officious mumbo jumbo" are the same as why we use languages like C# or Java or VB or whatever to write code.

When you have some structure to your requirements, you'll begin to see patterns evolve. This makes it easier to write similar requirements more clearly. Structure also makes it easier to inspect the requirements since you can train your eyes to easily spot a "wrong" requirement (http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/Wrong.html). You could even write a parser to automate some of the inspection process, looking for ambiguous words and weak phrases.

Personally I don't care if you write use cases, user stories, functional requirements or foo bars, just write them so that they are complete, precise, verifiable, distinct, unique, and traceable. Your team will thank you for it.
Former COBOL Programmer
Thursday, December 22, 2005
 
 
One of the teams I work with uses P-Language to create specifications.  It seems to work nicely for them.  Check out Tom Gilb's website to see what's available (courses, reference material, etc):

http://www.gilb.com/
anon
Thursday, December 22, 2005
 
 
Steve McConnell's outfit, Construx, offers some pretty good training as well:

http://www.construx.com/training/courses/
anon
Thursday, December 22, 2005
 
 
I'm looking for a training course that can be used immediately on the job for a new hire.  I see a lot of requirements based training which is the first step in writing functional and technical specs.  We have a functional spec writer but are looking to add a technical spec writer that would be responsible for the technical aspect of the spec also needed by the product development department.
Renee Galligher Send private email
Tuesday, January 03, 2006
 
 

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