The Design of Software (CLOSED)

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new compiler

Please see:
http://discuss.joelonsoftware.com/default.asp?joel.3.226936.0

Not doing all that well over there for some reason. I thought I'd try it here.
poor chap
Wednesday, October 12, 2005
 
 
Yeah...um...I can't see it doing all that well here either...whatever it was. :)
Andrey Butov Send private email
Wednesday, October 12, 2005
 
 
Why not?
poor chap
Wednesday, October 12, 2005
 
 
The link you provided (at least as of now, Wednesday 10.12.2005, 4:29:15 EST) is empty.
Andrey Butov Send private email
Wednesday, October 12, 2005
 
 
> Want to know the class layout of an interesting .NET
> program, but don't have access to the source code?

By the way, how does Chinchilla figure out what the class names, namespaces etc are without having access to the source code? Are you telling me that when you use .NET, all that information is available in the exe/dll?? Geesh!  There is no privacy any more, is there?!  :)
poor chap
Wednesday, October 12, 2005
 
 
Correct. .NET assemblies (.dll and .exe files targetted to run on the .NET framework), and I believe Java bytecode as well, contain type information which is typically used to dynamically instantiate types, allowing you to delay binding to a later time.

Chinchilla uses .NET reflection mechanisms to implement its functionality.

Incidentally, an earlier version of Chinchilla did use available source code directly. For this, a full-fledged C++ parser was implemented (in Java of all things). This code is now retired, but portions of it might be used later on for more advanced Chinchilla features.
Andrey Butov Send private email
Wednesday, October 12, 2005
 
 
"Yeah...um...I can't see it doing all that well here either...whatever it was. :)"
 - Andrey Butov

"Why not?"
 - poor chap

Poor chap: Try following the link you provided in your post! It's a bit... thin. ;)
EKB Send private email
Wednesday, October 12, 2005
 
 
Looks like the other post got deleted. I am not sure why.

I currently have VS6. I use the C++ compiler for projects. I am planning to upgrade to take advantage of a better, more complient C++ compiler, but I can't decide what to do.

I am thinking about getting VS .net 2003 Standard Edition. It is cheap but it doesnt have the optimizer. So a few thoughts I had:

* Get SE and use it in conjuction with VS toolkit 2003 which does have the optimizer

* Wait until VS 2005 goes live and perhaps take advantage of any discounts VS 2003 might get.

I looked into Borland CBuilder, but the professional edition is even more expensive. The personal edition is very restricting.

Any recommendations?


p.s.  I hope this post doesn't get deleted too. :)
poor chap
Wednesday, October 12, 2005
 
 
Borland C++Builder is only an option if you are interested in its GUI building capabilities, which are the same as in Borland Delphi. Otherwise, the compiler is not nearly as good as MSVC++ 7.1 which is in the free toolkit.
Frederik Slijkerman Send private email
Thursday, October 13, 2005
 
 
Sounds like I'll stick with the latest version of gcc for now.
poor chap
Thursday, October 13, 2005
 
 

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