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Installers...

Hi there!

I'm sure this has been answered before, but... My small company cannot afford expensive installers (for a Java product) right now - I want to use something cheap ( < $1000 US) and good, or even free. Is there anything out there that people can recommend?

Thanks for any help.

Mike.
Mike Barns Send private email
Tuesday, September 27, 2005
 
 
Good4u
Tuesday, September 27, 2005
 
 
There's a Windows installer that MS Open Source'd last year.

Go over to SourceForge.net and search on "wix" for info and related tools.
KC Send private email
Tuesday, September 27, 2005
 
 
Thanks to all - shall look into these installers!
Mike Barns Send private email
Tuesday, September 27, 2005
 
 
Nullsoft SuperPIMP:

http://nsis.sourceforge.net/
http://nsis.sourceforge.net/features/

A really good, free (both senses) installer.  Creates install programs that don't need to uncompress themselves millions of times.
Jon Send private email
Tuesday, September 27, 2005
 
 
Are these tools good for Java apps too? I.e. installing JRE, etc.
Mike Barns Send private email
Tuesday, September 27, 2005
 
 
IzPack might be worth looking at:

http://www.izforge.com/izpack/

It relies on the JRE already being installed on the user's machine though. I'm sure that there are other installer tools that allow you to bundle the JRE.

Bundling the JRE ofcourse will mean that your installer will be a few extra MB in size. This could be an issue if users are expected to download your software.
Rob T
Tuesday, September 27, 2005
 
 
I've been wondering lately about an installer for a Java app also.  Is it a good idea to package things like java, mySql, tomcat, etc. in an install that I deliver?  Eventually I want to install to both Linux and Win, but for now I'm just focusing on Windows.
XYZZY
Tuesday, September 27, 2005
 
 
If its a windows setup only, then I second InnoSetup. When I used that I could create a damn nice looking installer in about an hour. You can set it up to run other installers when finished as well - e.g. an installer for a JRE.
Daniel S
Wednesday, September 28, 2005
 
 
"Is it a good idea to package things like java, mySql, tomcat, etc. in an install that I deliver?"

I would say: if your installer is on CD / DVD etc. then yes; a few extra megs won't do any harm and you'll save some people some effort.

If your installer is to be downloaded then no, if the client already has the required JRE etc then they would be downloading unnecessarily and if they don't then it's no extra effort or downloading time as long as your installer does the job for them. I would strongly advise that the checks / downloads be done as upfront as possible, though, because you'll need (or at least, should ask for) the client's permission before downloading / installing other things that they haven't explicitly agreed to.
Paul Brown Send private email
Wednesday, September 28, 2005
 
 
NSIS is nice because it imposes very little overhead on your distribution (adding ~35K or something), but it does so at the expense of a really obscure and difficult to use scripting language. I think InnoSetup's use of Pascal is much nicer.
Chris Winters Send private email
Wednesday, September 28, 2005
 
 
> Are these tools good for Java apps too? I.e.
> installing JRE, etc.

The Inno setup has a built-in Pascal like scripting language which makes it possible to spawn other installers from within your main installation.
Jussi Jumppanen
Monday, October 03, 2005
 
 
We use the BitRock installer for everthing.  Check it out.

 http://www.bitrock.com
John Koenig Send private email
Saturday, October 08, 2005
 
 

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