The Design of Software (CLOSED)

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OpenSource Stack:

What do you think, mostly java oriented:

http://www.jroller.com/page/berlinbrown/20050824

Eclipse
Linux or servers ( Apache / MySQL / Gentoo )
Python for Scripting
Cygwin
Firefox
CVS ; Version Control
Subversion (TSVN) ; Version Control, Integrate with Eclipse

J2EE Stack

Java
Spring
OpenJMS ; Java Messaging
(Optional) JBoss
IrfvanView (not OSS, but good tool)
PHP ; Possibly for prototyping
Log4j
Ant
MySQL JDBC Driver
Hibernate ; Database ORM
Struts ; MVC Framework
Jsf ; JavaServerFaces MVC
Junit ; Unit Testing
Jython ; Python for Java
Javamail ; Java Mail
Apache Jakarta Tools (Some of them)
Jakartacommons
Axis – Webservices
Berlin Brown Send private email
Thursday, August 25, 2005
 
 
How buzzword compliant.
Li-fan Chen Send private email
Thursday, August 25, 2005
 
 
"I contend that a IBM Websphere or BEA stack or Oracle stack, Microsoft.NET stack of technology tools might sound or be impressive. But, it doesn‘t scale, it is not liquid. It won‘t give you what you want when you want it. "

Care to back this up with some examples/evidence?
Just me (Sir to you) Send private email
Thursday, August 25, 2005
 
 
I think your list above is pretty complete without diving into specific libraries.  Just remember that these just make up a toolbox, not a solution.
KC Send private email
Thursday, August 25, 2005
 
 
Tapestry is another MVC framework, one that even JSF experts say is (currently) superior.

SiteMesh is often used to replace Struts Tiles. Not compatable with JSF, though.

Xkins looks like a nice skinning framework, but haven't tried it yet.

Velocity/FreeMarker/Facelets are replacements for JSP.

Lucene is a nice search engine for in-site search.

XDoclet is also very popular (Attribute-oriented Programming)

Scarab is used for issue tracking.
Ben M
Thursday, August 25, 2005
 
 
When did this use of the word "stack" begin?  And what exactly does it mean? 

I've never heard a definition of it, but it seems to mean nothing more than "the collection of software and software tools that are used in building an application."

That definition seems so loose as to be silly, so I'm thinking there must be something more to it.  What?
Herbert Sitz Send private email
Thursday, August 25, 2005
 
 
I think of stack as something that is layered or has multiple, completely seperate components.  I don't know, stack seems like a good word.

"IBM Websphere or BEA stack or Oracle stack, Microsoft.NET stack of technology tools might sound or be impressive. But, it doesn‘t scale, it is not liquid."

On these, they are expensive.  If you start to grow or what you want to do with your software grows, then you have to buy more of the software I listed above.  If you already have opensource technology inplace or opensource technology that you want to add on to what you have existing, it is cheaper than those techs I listed.  Examples of those being expensive, well they are more expensive than zero.  I would use Oracle because it is a cool database, I meant to leave that out.  In terms of the MS technology, from what I have seen .NET doesnt provide a lot of technology that is open and setup for J2EE, I could be wrong?  For example ORM(Hibernate), Open build tools(Ant, Maven), Middleware system(Spring), Opensource scripting(Python/Jython), Messaging(JMS)... I have only see people on the .NET side use VB.NET and C#.NET and try to hack together a web-application, which is fine.
Berlin Brown
Thursday, August 25, 2005
 
 
KC Send private email
Thursday, August 25, 2005
 
 
"I have seen .NET doesnt provide a lot of technology that is open and setup for J2EE, I could be wrong?  For example ORM(Hibernate), Open build tools(Ant, Maven)..."

There are .NET versions of Hibernate, Ant, Log4j, and Junit, and... for just about any Java open source tool, there is probably a .NET version of it too.  I have not looked at all of the Java tool that you have listed, but some of them are built into .NET, such as WebServices, and others on the list, like CVS and firefox have nothing to do with any particular language.
SteveM Send private email
Thursday, August 25, 2005
 
 
"Lucene is a nice search engine for in-site search.

XDoclet is also very popular (Attribute-oriented Programming)

Scarab is used for issue tracking."


I did a presentation at Northern Virginia Linux Users' Group a couple weeks back and mentioned Scarab.  People seemed genuinely disgusted by it.  I wasn't all that surprised because I originally went to Mantis because Scarab is unusable out of the box.

Lucene is great as it offers a huge amount of power in search criteria, etc, but it only looks at flat files, so it's not useful for database driven sites.
KC Send private email
Thursday, August 25, 2005
 
 
I was actually thinking about using Nutch for a project.  Haven't decided yet.
Berlin Brown Send private email
Thursday, August 25, 2005
 
 
If that is what you mean, Windows Server/.NET would have loads of those things out of the box, others are completely "stack" indendant (e.g. Subversion), and other stuff would have .NET ports which are just as "free".

I still can't see what is the point exactly with the "liquid" thing.
Just me (Sir to you) Send private email
Friday, August 26, 2005
 
 
Interesting answer - what was the question?

Friday, August 26, 2005
 
 
"I was actually thinking about using Nutch for a project.  Haven't decided yet."

Doug Cutting - the lead on Nutch - is a sharp guy.  I had the opportunity to talk with one of his friends at a conference recently and looked into it.  Impressive.
KC Send private email
Friday, August 26, 2005
 
 
KC - He must be impressive if talking to his friends gives you awe. :)

Wish I could do that.
YaYaYa Send private email
Friday, August 26, 2005
 
 
Not quite.  I became familiar with his project due to the conversation.  Digging into it further gave me the positive impression.
KC Send private email
Friday, August 26, 2005
 
 
> When did this use of the word "stack" begin?  And what exactly does it mean?

I met "protocol stack" probably 20 years ago.
Christopher Wells Send private email
Saturday, August 27, 2005
 
 
I abused 'stack' a while back after seeing some people do it on mailing lists. It used to mean TCP/IP/OSF layers but I find it useful in describing loosely-coupled infrastructure dependencies in web or desktop application development.
Li-fan Chen Send private email
Sunday, August 28, 2005
 
 
I'd be tempted to keep the stack as small as possible, for instance, at the very least, as an absolute non-debatable minimum, _one_ version control system.
Arafangion
Wednesday, August 31, 2005
 
 
> When did this use of the word "stack" begin?  And what exactly does it mean?

I met "protocol stack" probably 20 years ago.
                              Christopher Wells

-- - - - -

For more on "protocol stack" see:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Protocol_stack

I also encountered "stack" decades ago, in an intro to the TCP/IP "protocol stack".
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TCP/IP

Google the quoted phrase "application stack" and get 21,100 hits.

If you read the following from wikipedia and replace the word "protocol" with "application" you may get a sense of how the use of "stack" with respect to "application stacks" has come into usage:

> Individual *protocols* within a suite are often
> designed with a single purpose in mind. This
> modularisation makes design and evaluation easier.
> Because each *protocol* module usually communicates
> with two others, they are commonly imagined as layers
> in a stack of protocols.

hth,

g
Greg Hamer Send private email
Monday, September 05, 2005
 
 

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