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How to get Microsoft to respond on a bug?

I know this is off-topic, but I've tried in vain on Microsoft's newsgroups.
It took me a fair amount of blood and sweat to isolate a bug in GDI+. I produced a small sample app that demonstrates the problem (which causes an access violation), and have posted it several times to microsoft.public.win32.programmer.gdi, only to receive responses from what I can only guess must be 14-year olds, but never a word from Redmond. What options does one have? I'd like to get this fixed, for two reasons:

1. I don't want to write the workaround.
2. It irritates me.

What can one do?

Ben Harper.
Benjamin Harper Send private email
Thursday, June 23, 2005
 
 
Well, though it would be great to get it fixed, if you think that's going to stop you having to implement a workaround, well... I admire your optimism, put it that way. How often do service releases come out for that part of the API? Unless yours is a showstopper in a common case scenario, i'd be suprised if they considered it economical to fix. The testing times for any changes to core components are enormous... It's  worth a try, but I'd assume you're going to have to write that workaround anyway...
Andrew Cherry Send private email
Thursday, June 23, 2005
 
 
Go to http://lab.msdn.microsoft.com/productfeedback/

(note: if the the page wont let you submit a bug, you may need to loosen your cookie settings for the site)
Don Send private email
Thursday, June 23, 2005
 
 
You can call into Microsoft Product Support and open a case.  Unless it is a real show stopper you probably won't see a quick fix but never the less you are sure to get an answer and some feedback from us.

http://www.microsoft.com/services/microsoftservices/supp.mspx

Since it sounds like you have it isolated and probably have easy repro steps should get some resolution quickly.
m
Thursday, June 23, 2005
 
 
Become a large government thinking of switching to open source.
son of parnas
Thursday, June 23, 2005
 
 
Thanks for the help. I think I'll give them a call then since the bug reporting through the MSDN labs requires one to choose a specific development product.
Benjamin Harper Send private email
Thursday, June 23, 2005
 
 
If there _is_ a workaround, then there are probably a lot of bugs higher on their list than that one.
Kyralessa Send private email
Thursday, June 23, 2005
 
 
write a competing product.

you must be patient though, they wont actually fix anything until you have it at least as good as their current offerings.
Jesus H Christ
Friday, June 24, 2005
 
 
Also, are you sure it's not a _known_ bug?  I've encountered some of those, but they generally have workarounds.  (I just found another one today, actually.)
Kyralessa Send private email
Friday, June 24, 2005
 
 
Make it a security problem, if it causes an access violation there might be a way to make a buffer overflow exploit out of it, they`ll get round to taking care of that *real soon* if an exploit code was out.

Saturday, June 25, 2005
 
 
How interesting. For the first time in about 10 years of IT work I was involved in having a company respond to a bug in their software. Microsoft. The first thing out of the guy's mouth was why don't we write our app differently. Holy Cow. He even saw the bug ... but rather than find out what caused it he suggested we do something else to avoid it. It's the mentality of restarting servers when you have a problem. Then he began to ask the color of the car ... cus the brakes were making a sound.

I'm shocked. Why do companies put their dumbest people in these positions? It doesn't make sense.

Wednesday, July 06, 2005
 
 
Try getting an ISV Buddy at Microsoft.  They'll be able to find the right person to report the bug to.

This is a pretty cool program, where you can have a 1-on-1 relationship with someone at Microsoft who is on a team that's in a field related to what you work on.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/isv/isvbuddy/
Rob Leitman [MSFT]
Monday, July 11, 2005
 
 

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