* The Business of Software

A former community discussing the business of software, from the smallest shareware operation to Microsoft. A part of Joel on Software.

We're closed, folks!

Links:

» Business of Software FAQ
» The Business of Software Conference (held every fall, usually in Boston)
» Forum guidelines (Please read before posting!)

Moderators:

Andy Brice
Successful Software

Doug Nebeker ("Doug")

Jonathan Matthews
Creator of DeepTrawl, CloudTrawl, and LeapDoc

Nicholas Hebb
BreezeTree Software

Bob Walsh
host, Startup Success Podcast author of The Web Startup Success Guide and Micro-ISV: From Vision To Reality

Patrick McKenzie
Bingo Card Creator

Open niche?

As someone who has struggled to learn a 'simple' language for more than 10 years, I'm often on the sniff for new methods or tools...

I recently heard about this:

http://www.sk.com.br/sk-krash-english.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TPR_Storytelling

Naturally I immediately started sniffing around for any kinds of template or software...

Seems there's nothing? In fact wiki says:

"TPR Storytelling is unusual in that it is a grassroots movement among language teachers. After being developed by Blaine Ray in the 1990s, the method has gained popular appeal with language teachers who claim that they can reach more students and get better results than they could with previous methods.[2] However, so far it has seen little support from publishers or academic institutions. Teachers have instead published their own materials and teaching manuals, and training in TPR Storytelling is generally offered at workshops by existing TPRS teachers rather than at teacher training college."

I'm a sales guy, not a coder, but to me that's a 'ka-ching!' moment?

If people are making their own materials, what software are they using?

Wouldn't it be great if there were a solution specifically for producing such materials?

Just throwing it out there, if anyone feels it's worth chasing up.




AC
Reluctantlyregistered Send private email
Wednesday, December 23, 2015
 
 
AC since you have experience long form selling, why don't you throw something up to collect emails and see if you get bites?
Bring back anon Send private email
Wednesday, December 23, 2015
 
 
If I were good at throwing things up I would, but I know I'd obsess over it and take a few weeks...  :)

As a general rule I would advise people to shy away from "great ideas" and I make rude snorting noises at the idea of "build it and they will come..."

But when you have teachers unable to find materials and so making their own, that has "unmet demand" written all over it.

Was it Andy that created something for teachers, and did pretty well at it?



AC
Reluctantlyregistered Send private email
Thursday, December 24, 2015
 
 
Patrick McKenzie's first solo biz was mostly marketed towards teachers (bingo cards), and he did pretty well. You can read all about his journey on his blog.
Teachers have a really hard job. If you can make software to help them prepare class materials, they will happily pay you for it.
If you can, get in touch with some and talk to them. Try to understand their needs and pains.
Having a website that outlines what a potential product would do, with a signup form, is pretty quick to do. Don't worry about flashy design yet. Just start collecting emails and start talking to people.
You won't know if you don't try. :)
Calvert Send private email
Thursday, December 24, 2015
 
 

This topic is archived. No further replies will be accepted.

Other recent topics Other recent topics
 
Powered by FogBugz