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Andy Brice
Successful Software

Doug Nebeker ("Doug")

Jonathan Matthews
Creator of DeepTrawl, CloudTrawl, and LeapDoc

Nicholas Hebb
BreezeTree Software

Bob Walsh
host, Startup Success Podcast author of The Web Startup Success Guide and Micro-ISV: From Vision To Reality

Patrick McKenzie
Bingo Card Creator

code style

I had a potential customer ask my code has been certified and if not  to run my code through FXCop or stylecop and share the results with them.

 Have any of you have been asked this and how you did you handl it.
Bill Anonomist Send private email
Wednesday, July 23, 2014
 
 
Are you selling the source code?
Andy Brice Send private email
Wednesday, July 23, 2014
 
 
No. It is just a single user license sale. Source code is not available for such sales. Business software and it's their IT people asking for this.
Bill Anonomist Send private email
Wednesday, July 23, 2014
 
 
In that case it sounds ridiculous. I would tell (very politely) to buy it as it is, or go away.

If you bend over for this ridiculous request, who knows what other hoops they will make you jump through.
Andy Brice Send private email
Wednesday, July 23, 2014
 
 
StyleCop? I thought that was just a tool that ensures your code has a consistent style, i.e., for teams that want to enforce style standards. It doesn't seem pertinent to the end user.

FxCop, on the other hand, can detect issues that lead to runtime problems. If you're running Visual Studio 2012 or 2013, Professional edition or higher, then it is included as the Code Analysis tool. If you run it and there are no issues found, all it displays is "No code analysis issues were detected". I don't know what you would send the customer, other than a screenshot.
Nicholas Hebb Send private email
Wednesday, July 23, 2014
 
 
If this is mission critical software that costs thousands then it may be a reasonable request.

I personally smell a "pointy haired boss" in the IT dept.
Ralph R Send private email
Wednesday, July 23, 2014
 
 
I concur this is an absurd request.

It's also odd enough that it would raise my suspicions the person is a competitor trying to find out things about my code base. Extremely technical questions about algorithms and development methodology are simply not things that normal users ask. It's a tell that there's probably something else going on.
Scott Send private email
Wednesday, July 23, 2014
 
 
@Scott
It is a large public corporation in the consumer products industry so not a competitor.
Bill Anonomist Send private email
Wednesday, July 23, 2014
 
 
Perhaps you could offer to do the analysis they want, but charge them a hefty fee in advance to make it worth your while?
Andy Brice Send private email
Thursday, July 24, 2014
 
 
Custom T&C - custom pricing, period. Make the latter 10x normal (100x if you don't really want to do custom T&C).

Writing from fresh experience of having been asked by a reseller to sign 12 pages of legalese over a single license sale (deal value in the low four-figure range). In the end, the customer simply placed an order through a different reseller.
Dmitry Leskov Send private email
Friday, July 25, 2014
 
 
"not a competitor ... a large public corporation"

OK, I get you know. So this is the big institutional bureaucracy situation where the purchasing agent has an IQ of 70 and is blindly following their byzantine procedure manual which was written by various Wharton and Harvard lawyers and MBAs over the years.

Good advice from Dmitry and Andy on this.
Scott Send private email
Friday, July 25, 2014
 
 
Two days ago I politely told them no on the code certification issue and have not heard back. I am not interested in doing it even for a fee because the price of the product is too low to make any sense for  them and just not worth my time.
Bill Anonomist Send private email
Friday, July 25, 2014
 
 
Charge a silly amount to make it worth your time. They might even pay it. Or (more likely) they'll decide it isn't actually that important.
Andy Brice Send private email
Saturday, July 26, 2014
 
 
Andy Brice +1
Emily Jones Send private email
Thursday, July 31, 2014
 
 
Yes, I'd charge them $X0,000 and then offer to be on site to personally go over your code with their tech lead or auditor for one day. Or they can pay $X0,000-$travel to do it over remote desktop.
Dan 9000 Send private email
Friday, August 01, 2014
 
 
They finaly bought a license without any further mention on the subject.
Bill Anonomist Send private email
Thursday, August 07, 2014
 
 

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