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Successful Software

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Comparison of Software Development Platforms

Hi, I am aspiring to start an ISV, to cater to a specific industry by building a customized software and eventually grow into a product. I have been in talking terms to different SMB business owners of the industry to understand their needs.
However, I don't possess the software development skills. I want to get this idea implemented as my first step. This would include finding the right resources from scratch.
Can anyone please help me understand what all aspects do I need to consider? Also which software development platforms are available, that will involve cheaper costs for SMB's, and are scalable later on?
Thanks in advance for your help.
RK Send private email
Monday, March 17, 2014
 
 
Those are very hard questions because you're asking to sum up the entire software eco system into a paragraph answer.  In other words, there are thousands of options.

Maybe someone else will be more clever than me, but every time I try to think of an answer for you, I get overwhelmed with all of the "it depends" I keep coming up with.

Normally we'd recommend you choose technologies you're already familiar with.  The tech choices rarely make a huge different in the long run (of course there will be counter examples to this too).

You probably need to narrow down your goal.  Is this for a mobile/tablet app?  Web-based?  That will eliminate a few possibilities.
Doug Send private email
Monday, March 17, 2014
 
 
+1 to Doug for "It depends".

Without some clues it is impossible to answer these questions.
Scorpio Send private email
Monday, March 17, 2014
 
 
I want to start a law firm but I'm not a lawyer.

I want to start a medical practice but I'm not a doctor.

I want to start an engineering firm but I'm not an engineer.

I want to start a software company but I don't know anything about software development.

Why do people think #4 is reasonable, but the other 3 are clearly insane?
Jason Send private email
Monday, March 17, 2014
 
 
Because building a software product is close to being a one-time process, which can be a work-for-hire.




AC
Reluctantlyregistered Send private email
Monday, March 17, 2014
 
 
> Can anyone please help me understand what all aspects do I need to consider?

User experience, market need, coding quality, coding cost, code maintenance and testing cost, marketing (web presence, SEO, promotions, ad placement, ad copy, integration with other tools), customer management, legal (liability, patents, IP law, corporation formation or not), scalability, personal interest...what else?

> Also which software development platforms are available, that will involve cheaper costs for SMB's, and are scalable later on?

It's wide open and should be dictated more by what is the nature of the software.  Some things are more appropriate for desktop, some for web, some for mobile, some for all. There are advantages and disadvantages to all of them. You'd need to describe the goals of the software/service better here first. "Scalable" generally refers to web services that have big concurrently-using user bases, so that wouldn't make as much sense for a desktop application (or, I guess, mobile, though I know not of what I speak there).

Oh, and there is a school of thought that says that you shouldn't go into the software business if you know nothing about making software.
Racky Send private email
Monday, March 17, 2014
 
 
If you know nothing about software development then you need to outline what exactly it is you want the software to achieve. And a basic business plan on you plan to market and sell the software won't hurt.

Then you need to find a good partner you trust to manage the development (this partner doesn't necessarily have to be the developer but is capable of managing developers.), while you handle sales and business. You need to have a solid agreement/contract between you and the partner that clearly state how they are being compensated and what there position is in your new company.

Approach it like opening a restaurant and needing to hire a head chef.

You need a programmer/manager with experience preferably in the domain you're interested in developing for. Then they will pick the platform. You shouldn't be deciding this, at least not by yourself and it's way to early in the process.
TrippinOnIT Send private email
Monday, March 17, 2014
 
 
You should definitely choose Technology X. Technology X is the best solution for these, and all other sorts of problems. Technology X is the proven and best solution to all your technology needs.

When you need high reliability, low cost, ease of use, and meeting deadlines, choose Technology X.

Sincerely,

Scott
CEO, Technology X Inc.
Scott Send private email
Monday, March 17, 2014
 
 
"Because building a software product is close to being a one-time process, which can be a work-for-hire."

Your reasoning also applies to legal and medical  problems as well. Using your reasoning, if someone needs brain surgery, it's OK to hire an amateur because it is a "one time work for hire" sort of thing.
Scott Send private email
Monday, March 17, 2014
 
 
>Because building a software product is close to being a one-time process

Only if it is software that no-one uses. All the succesful software products I can think of are very much a 'work in progress'.
Andy Brice Send private email
Monday, March 17, 2014
 
 
> Scott
> CEO, Technology X Inc.

Aha!  Scott finally slipped and gave away his secret identity!
Racky Send private email
Monday, March 17, 2014
 
 
Find a technical co-founder whom you trust, and who will trust that you can do all the non-technical stuff and are committed to it.

If you fail, go get a CS degree or similar. You can drop out whenever you feel you know enough about the field to not rely on the advice of a group of total strangers on the Internet when picking up a s/w development platform.
Dmitry Leskov Send private email
Tuesday, March 18, 2014
 
 
"Only if it is software that no-one uses. All the succesful software products I can think of are very much a 'work in progress'."

Which is why I said it's close to that. You can hire someone one time to produce a working product that can be sold. Updates for new OS, or requested features, bux fixes and such make it a work in progress but simply launching doesn't have to be.

Regarding brain surgery, you don't need to be a surgeon to recognize the need for a private hospital. In fact off the top of my head I don't know of any hospitals that were opened by brain surgeons.

Are there any?



AC
Reluctantlyregistered Send private email
Tuesday, March 18, 2014
 
 
Please do not pretend you said something different. That is not honest.

You  stated: "Because building a software product is close to being a one-time process, which can be a work-for-hire."
Scott Send private email
Tuesday, March 18, 2014
 
 
Yes, that is exactly what I said, and which I maintain.

You seem to be under the false impression that only a software coder is capable of funding, running and marketing a company that happens to sell software?




AC
Reluctantlyregistered Send private email
Tuesday, March 18, 2014
 
 

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