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Andy Brice
Successful Software

Doug Nebeker ("Doug")

Jonathan Matthews
Creator of DeepTrawl, CloudTrawl, and LeapDoc

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BreezeTree Software

Bob Walsh
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Patrick McKenzie
Bingo Card Creator

Pay-Per-Install : What do you think?

Hello,

Every few weeks I get an email with an offer to give away my software where in I would be paid for every installation.

So basically, they would wrap my product with their installer, track installation & pay me.

Anybody tried this & have been successful?
How much do they normally pay?
What are the pitfalls?
Which companies do you suggest?
Gautam Jain Send private email
Friday, March 07, 2014
 
 
Think carefully about why they want to pay you to install your software.  What exactly is their wrapper doing?  I can tell you from experience: it will install a lot of other crap that consumers wouldn't download on their own.  So your app becomes a crap delivery mechanism.

I would stay far, far away.
Doug Send private email
Friday, March 07, 2014
 
 
A lot of these pay-per-install people are very dodgy. They could be installing god-knows-what on your customers machines and you'll get the blame. The hateful babylon toolbar is almost impossible to uninstall.

See also:

http://successfulsoftware.net/2012/07/12/ads-vs-toolbars-vs-charging/
Andy Brice Send private email
Friday, March 07, 2014
 
 
If you accept you are the equivalent of the guy who accepts $500 to fly with a bag from Columbia to London. You had better be pretty sure you know what is in the bag...
Andy Brice Send private email
Friday, March 07, 2014
 
 
One good way to make money from useful free software you have written is to enter into an agreement to have your software be wrapped with an installer that installs malware on the client's system. This is big business. You can point to lots of companies that do this, including some companies that don't remember giving consent for it.

I won't even bother to discuss whether this is a good idea or tell you you shouldn't. Anyone with a tiny bit of sense would already know the answer to that one, so my trying to convince such a person who doesn't know already would be a pointless exercise.
Scott Send private email
Friday, March 07, 2014
 
 
Nicholas Hebb Send private email
Friday, March 07, 2014
 
 
Pretty much what everybody else has said, though in fairness there are some legitimate offers out there.

Have you seen their installer? What does it do? If it's transparently offering to install another software (which the user can refuse, preferably *without* having to untick anything, i.e. they have to tick to say yes to it) then one could say "Why not?"

But there is a reason why not - because people hate it.

Are they offering to give you more money than you get from selling your SW?

Realistically they probably want to use it to install some bitcoin mining malware



AC
Reluctantlyregistered Send private email
Saturday, March 08, 2014
 
 
Yes. For several years, I have been refusing each email that offers Pay-Per-Install.

But sometime back in this forum one of the members expressed that he earned lot of money by giving away his free software this way.

So this caused me to come back again & ask.

Thanks for all your help :)
Gautam Jain Send private email
Saturday, March 08, 2014
 
 
> you are the equivalent of the guy who accepts $500 to fly with a bag from Columbia to London. You had better be pretty sure you know what is in the bag.

Very good analogy!
PSB136 Send private email
Saturday, March 08, 2014
 
 
Mark Pincus did it while building Zynga:  http://www.escapistmagazine.com/news/view/96024-Zynga-CEO-Admits-to-Being-a-Scammer

Personally, I put all of my focus on improving the quality of my product so that my users will be happy to pay us more and tell others about us.  We also engage in rigorous A/B split testing on every step of our trial and installation to increase the conversion rates.
C. Stark Send private email
Saturday, March 08, 2014
 
 

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