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Version number for initial release

So, my app is now basically done, including the manual.  Just a few things to clear up with InnoSetup and then to submit everywhere.

A question, though: if I release it as v1.00, will that put potential buyers off?  The manual's history shows v0.98 as being for internal use, and v0.99 for beta-tester use (basically just my family but customers don't need to know that), with v1.00 being the official public release.

Should be okay?
PSB136 Send private email
Tuesday, February 11, 2014
 
 
I would go with 1.0 so people know it's the first release. Ten years from now you'll look back and see the first revision as awful junk compared to version 5.0. What if you labelled it 5.0 though for first release? Well then customers would say "Wow, I can't believe it has all these problems after five releases, this dude must really suck and be hopeless." But calling it 1.0 when they notice things they say, oh this is a 1.0, I'll just send him an email with a bug report. Customers are easier on you.

When I see a larger version number that suggests the product has been around for 10 years, I definitely have an expectation of more quality and stability. If that's not there, it looks like a hopeless case. After 10 years the guy should have done better.
Scott Send private email
Wednesday, February 12, 2014
 
 
Technically that's fine.

From a selling point of view I'd call it version 1.1

Perception counts and version 1.0 says "Noob, bug-ridden and maybe spyware".

Sorry, but it does.

1.1 says "Newer, fresh, improved, and others have used it before me, so. worth a try.."



AC
Reluctantlyregistered Send private email
Wednesday, February 12, 2014
 
 
Version 1.1 is super! I read somewhere that the first version should be 2.0;)
Alex Vasilevsky Send private email
Wednesday, February 12, 2014
 
 
I would call it
My App 2014

and show your version number in the apps about window only.
Or download page as file version number..

When you call it My App 2014,  it sounds fresh, not noob.

and when you release My App 2015 next year.  people will pay you for it again.

When you go from v1.x and users already have say 1.8,  they cant seem to pay for 2.0 when 2.0 comes out.  but the moment you release the 2015 version,  even if its  v1.9    they will be willing to pay for it. because its the new version for the year. and sounds fresh.

I would not put My App 1.0

Just call it My App

if you dont want to put the year in it.
version number does not belong in the name.  At least not initially.

1.x is just a new app full of issues.

+1 if you agree to put the year at the end of the name.

If you don't +1, then you should add the year at the end of your own product, and see your sales increase. :)
Speaking form experience here.

Users pay me yearly, year in year out.
NewGuyOnTheBlock Send private email
Wednesday, February 12, 2014
 
 
You are overthinking it. People not buying your app most certainly won't have anything to do with its version number.
Dmitry Leskov Send private email
Wednesday, February 12, 2014
 
 
> Users pay me yearly, year in year out

Hmm... interesting concept.  I can totally see how last year's date on an app would psychologically make people want to buy the latest year instead.  Nice!

So, if someone pays $20 for "MyApp 2014" tomorrow, I could let them have free updates all year, but then they'd have to pay full price again a year later for "MyApp 2015"?

Now you're delaying my release while I ponder this new problem.  Time for a night motorcycle ride I think.  :)  Always clears the head.
PSB136 Send private email
Wednesday, February 12, 2014
 
 
Back again... and found this old article about version numbers vs dates:

http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/2007/02/whats-in-a-version-number-anyway.html

Some interesting points in it.  Also had some related ideas while riding, but I'll post them later (need sleep).

Thanks again for all your ideas, guys.  It's a good forum!  :)
PSB136 Send private email
Wednesday, February 12, 2014
 
 
@NewGuyOnTheBlock your idea is wonderful! It's as Visual Studio 2010, 2012, 2013, ... ;)
Alex Vasilevsky Send private email
Wednesday, February 12, 2014
 
 
@PSB136  I read your article and decided to call the new versions with pattern "2014.1.*", where the first number is the year, the second - the number of updates throughout the year, and the rest - build number. What you say?
Alex Vasilevsky Send private email
Wednesday, February 12, 2014
 
 
The first version of dBASE II was version 2.02.

Personally, I do not care for trickery like this.

Sincerely,

Gene Wirchenko
Gene Wirchenko Send private email
Wednesday, February 12, 2014
 
 
Personally I find yearly paid upgrades annoying. When companies go on a 1 year major feature release cycle, quality tends to go down the toilet.

A lot of good products come out every 2-3 years, with lots of stability and minor enhancement work in between. And that's for companies that have a large staff and can issue significant upgrades.
Scott Send private email
Wednesday, February 12, 2014
 
 
If your software is not stand alone and in anyway associated with or depended on use with other software be careful about version numbers correlating.

For instances if your software has to be used in conjunction with Office 2013 and your software is labeled 2012 or 2014 users may not know which products are compatible with what. So if you use date numbering with Office you may have to release a new version with each office release so people can associate the compatibility.
TrippinOnIT Send private email
Wednesday, February 12, 2014
 
 
@PSB136
I know you want to put your spin on every suggestion or idea given by this forum, and thats ok, but you should try to follow the advice of people who have done it before you and failed.  Learn from other peoples mistakes and successes.  Dont reinvent the wheel.

There is no such thing as My App v2014.1
:)

Either call it 1.0  (which is something you should not do.  Users should not really see your version number anywhere other than in documentation, and your apps about box in your help menu.)

When a saas app comes out, they dont call it  mysaas 1.0 do they?  They dont even call it  mysaas 2014 in most cases.
The version number does not belong in the product name, unless its mature.

Just call it  My App  if you dont want to put the year in the name.

But having a year in the name, will improve your sales.
NewGuyOnTheBlock Send private email
Wednesday, February 12, 2014
 
 
How about you give it a code name (if it is good enough for Microsoft and Ubuntu), like"

MyApp "Chicago"
My App "Longview"
My App "Wacky Wildebeest"
MyApp "Judgment Day"
MyApp "Candy-Colored Clown They Call the Sandman"
MyApp "What's that?  Ham?"
MyApp "My Back.  I Think I Pulled It."
Racky Send private email
Wednesday, February 12, 2014
 
 
So, if I use the year name in the title, somebody using "MyApp 2014" will go to my website, and see the same name there, and think "gee, no updates" and leave.  However, if they see "v1.02" on the website and their app's window title says "v1.01", then they'll stay and look into it.

If I have just the year displayed everywhere, how will a newbie know if there's been an update?  You can't put the version number elsewhere on the website, because you may as well just do what I said in the paragraph above.

Unless I'm missing something?  I think v1.01 for an initial release and skip the year numbers is the best bet.
PSB136 Send private email
Wednesday, February 12, 2014
 
 
> PSB136  I read your article

That's not my article.  Nothing to do with me.
PSB136 Send private email
Wednesday, February 12, 2014
 
 
I have nothing else to contribute to this topic
/me walks away frustrated :)
NewGuyOnTheBlock Send private email
Thursday, February 13, 2014
 
 
Well, what am I to do?  You say use the year, everyone else says use version numbers.  Whose advice do I take?
PSB136 Send private email
Thursday, February 13, 2014
 
 
You should use a version number. I do to.
But its not part of the product's name.

Think of it like this

My App 2014 v1.0  (but you dont put the version number in the name, you just show it on download page, or about dialog)

My App 2014 v1.5
My App 2015 v1.6
My App 2015 v2.0
My App 2015 v2.8
My App 2016 v2.9
My App 2016 v3.0

Notice, the version number scrolls on its own.  While the year releases are updated in the title to make the app look fresh. 
Fresh as in, give your users to update to latest version.

Do you think much of Visual Studios code functionalities changed from 2010 to 2013?

I don think I've used much of the extra features of the 2005, 2008, 2010, or 2012 version.

I can do what I do now in 2012 version,  in 2005 version. (almost)
But I must pay for the latest version each year because its fresh.
But I think you get my point.

Most users here are more techincal.  We care about version numbers and tech details.

Average users could not give a flying goose about a v.ersion number in the title.

Just call it My App
and just put v1.0 in the about us, or download page.

Thats all I'm saying.

The version number does not belong in the products name.
Its not 1995 anymore. :)

here is advice from first result on google search :)
http://programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/130858/date-as-software-version-number

If your product is done, and the manual is ready.  I'm giving you 72hours to make your decision and release your app to the masses (the hand full of people that will stumble upon your website in the first week : ))
NewGuyOnTheBlock Send private email
Thursday, February 13, 2014
 
 
But what if I don't update the app between December and January?  Is it ethical to change it from "My App 2014" to "My App 2015" if no changes were made?  Or should I fake the history doc with some BS bug fixes?
PSB136 Send private email
Thursday, February 13, 2014
 
 
BTW, I do like the idea of someone seeing an old year in the title and updating to the latest version just to see the current year there, especially if they're the sort of customer who wouldn't normally update because the app does all they need as it stands.  :)
PSB136 Send private email
Thursday, February 13, 2014
 
 
@NewGuyOnTheBlock My proposition is versions with pattern "2014.1.*", where the first number is the year, the second - the number of updates throughout the year, and the rest - build number. What you say?
Alex Vasilevsky Send private email
Thursday, February 13, 2014
 
 
@NewGuyOnTheBlock We can also use zero for the first version since the beginning of the year. Example: 2014.0, 2014.1, ...
Alex Vasilevsky Send private email
Thursday, February 13, 2014
 
 
The name and the version are very separate items.

The name can have the year inside if you like, also a progressive number.
The version can be the "build" number and should not appear in the name of the product but MUST appear in the installer name!

if a user goes on your web site will discover MySoft 2014 and in the download button and page, build123 released dd/mm/yyyy

Ms Office has a product name and it does not have versions but patches numbers...

Vegas pro, a video editing software I own, at startup checks if a new build is available for my product vegas pro 12 and will let me download and install free of charge. When it will find vegas pro 13 it will offer me a discount to buy the new product.
fp615 Send private email
Thursday, February 13, 2014
 
 
I agree, that is technically correct, anyway what happen if you use the model Year. Version,  for example, 2014.1

Hope it helps.
Peter from FreeSharewareDepot Send private email
Thursday, February 13, 2014
 
 
Okay, I've done it... my app is officially named "MyApp 2014 (v1.01)"  in the window caption and website.  That way, coders like us get to see the actual version number without going for the "About" box, and non-coders get that "out of date" feeling when 2015 arrives, which should hopefully make them buy an update.  :)
PSB136 Send private email
Friday, February 14, 2014
 
 
I just hope that having "2014" on there won't actually discourage the layman from updating during the year now... because they'll think the app is current and up to date!  Hmm.  Didn't think of that.
PSB136 Send private email
Friday, February 14, 2014
 
 
That is exactly what I've been saying :)
Congrats! U've done it!

You generally dont care about people updating to latest version.
You should have an autoupdate checker in your app to check for latest version every 2 weeks or so and suggest user to update.
You dont need to reply on users comparing version numbers.

The purpose of the year in the name is to encourage people to purchase each year to upgrade (paid upgrade)

Its not for you to encourage them to update to the latest free version.

When is your official release date?
Please announce it here publicly so we can hold you to it :)
NewGuyOnTheBlock Send private email
Friday, February 14, 2014
 
 
I'd rather not embed year in the product name.

Imagine you release in 2014 and then stop updating the app in 2016. I think by 2019 the sales of YourApp 2016 would dry out completely, whereas YourApp 3.2 might still sell occasionally. All you'd need to do is verify that it still works on Windows 9, 10, or whatever numbering/naming scheme MS' Marketing Dept. would invent and update the system requirements and screenshots accordingly.
Dmitry Leskov Send private email
Saturday, February 15, 2014
 
 
Nice viewpoint, Dmitry.  Having the year on it does age it, that's for sure.  I was going to do it but now you've tipped me the other way.  This damn app is NEVER going to get released, LOL.  :)

As for screenshots with the version, I don't do that... when I build the exe for making screenshots, I have a flag called "showversion" set to 0, so it doesn't appear.  That way I can create timeless screenshots (assuming the UI doesn't change too much).  I set the flag back to 1 when building the release version to users.
PSB136 Send private email
Saturday, February 15, 2014
 
 
Re screenshots, my point was that if you take them on Windows 7 today, they will already look dated. Unless you have totally custom UI and only capture the interior of the window, that is.
Dmitry Leskov Send private email
Monday, February 17, 2014
 
 
If your latest version 98, then your software will look outdated and that you seem to have stopped development, but it will also stimulate you to make a new version. I vote for version 2014.0 ;)
Alex Vasilevsky Send private email
Monday, February 24, 2014
 
 

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