* The Business of Software

A former community discussing the business of software, from the smallest shareware operation to Microsoft. A part of Joel on Software.

We're closed, folks!

Links:

» Business of Software FAQ
» The Business of Software Conference (held every fall, usually in Boston)
» Forum guidelines (Please read before posting!)

Moderators:

Andy Brice
Successful Software

Doug Nebeker ("Doug")

Jonathan Matthews
Creator of DeepTrawl, CloudTrawl, and LeapDoc

Nicholas Hebb
BreezeTree Software

Bob Walsh
host, Startup Success Podcast author of The Web Startup Success Guide and Micro-ISV: From Vision To Reality

Patrick McKenzie
Bingo Card Creator

A theoretical question regarding SEO and content

Here is you chance SEO experts of BOS forum:
What is better if any: 10 pages with 500 letters each or the same text but put onto one  page  5000 letters long?
Better from Googles' point of view of course, who cares for what humans think any more...

If content alone is what matters than it should be the same, should not it?

I'm asking because it is much easier to maintain just one page than 10 of them
alexandar Send private email
Wednesday, March 27, 2013
 
 
>Better from Googles' point of view of course, who cares for what humans think any more...

Googles mission is to make information more useful for humans. So you are likely to do better *long term* if you structure your information in a way that is better for humans.

All google slaps come about from people who are gaming the system and structuring things for google and not humans.

Seems like we are still important - if only because that's who the machines are programmed to please ;)
Ryan Wheeler Send private email
Wednesday, March 27, 2013
 
 
Do what best for your users. Google takes into account abandon rate and time on page. If everyone leaves your pages within 2 seconds, that's not good.
Kuzmitskiy Dmitry Send private email
Wednesday, March 27, 2013
 
 
And loading time is an issue now too.

Break it into smaller pages.




AC
Reluctantlyregistered Send private email
Wednesday, March 27, 2013
 
 
> Google takes into account abandon rate and time on page.

How does it know?
Racky Send private email
Wednesday, March 27, 2013
 
 
Assuming that's correct, I imagine it would track when you came back to the search results by pressing the back button.
Jonathan Matthews Send private email
Wednesday, March 27, 2013
 
 
That's old wives tales
alexandar Send private email
Wednesday, March 27, 2013
 
 
Time on page and bounce rate are mostly via Google Analytics but the loading time is a certainty.

http://videos.webpronews.com/2009/11/matt-cutts-interview/



AC
Reluctantlyregistered Send private email
Wednesday, March 27, 2013
 
 
This is all about as clear as mud. So does Google penalize pages in the serps that have a high bounce rate? If so do they use information from Google Analytics to do this? What about Google Webmaster tools?

I find it hard to believe that Google does use bounce rate to rank pages in the serps. Given the recent degradation in the general quality of the results, this can't be a factor.
Andrew Gibson Send private email
Wednesday, March 27, 2013
 
 
I'm sure it affects Adwords CPC but for general SERPS I'm not so sure.


AC
Reluctantlyregistered Send private email
Thursday, March 28, 2013
 
 
Seems to me if you aren't using Google Analytics then time on page or whatever can't be recorded.  The point about using back doesn't seem right; it would give wildly inaccurate results and it probably wouldn't work because when you go back you are just using the cached page.
Racky Send private email
Thursday, March 28, 2013
 
 
> it probably wouldn't work because when you go back you are just using the cached page

They could know when you go back because they could just fire of an ajax request. I decided to try that out using an http sniffer. Turns out they don't do that (or at least didn't in my test), so they don't necessarily know when you go back.

But they can still get very useful data that's close to that. Whenever you click a search result with JS enabled a request is fired to Google before you're taken to the site. So Google could track that you went to search result A, then came back and clicked on search result B very quickly (a very strong indicator you didn't like page A much).

I don't know that they compile / use this data but I think they'd be crazy not to have at least tried it & I'd give it a high probability of being a very good indicator of page quality.

Note that quite often pages will come near the top of the SERPS when they're brand new then drop back down quickly. I'd bet that's Google experimenting to see whether real people actually stay on that new content & assigning it a quality score.
Jonathan Matthews Send private email
Thursday, March 28, 2013
 
 
>Note that quite often pages will come near the top of the SERPS when they're brand new then drop back down quickly. I'd bet that's Google experimenting to see whether real people actually stay on that new content & assigning it a quality score.

I seem to remember Matt Cutts confirming this in one of his videos (sorry can't remember which one, there are so many of them!)

Even if I'm mistaken though, I think it's worth assuming they do or will.
John W King Send private email
Friday, March 29, 2013
 
 

This topic is archived. No further replies will be accepted.

Other recent topics Other recent topics
 
Powered by FogBugz