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New SaaS – feedback appreciated

I am announcing service to automate proposals and quotations process: from draft to close phase.

Creating a proposal is usually a tedious and error-prone task and, despite most CRM track opportunities, this involves a lot of data entry that Quotty can avoid:

http://www.quotty.com

I would appreciate any feedback including:

- Evaluating the applicability (would you use it?)
- Criticizing the landing page
- Suggesting promoting strategies (my current and big issue)

Many thanks to everybody for your help!
Franco Graziosi Send private email
Thursday, March 14, 2013
 
 
I like the design of your home page, especially the cartoon guys. I also like how you broke the home page into three main benefits.

I think you might want to consider slimming down your copy. It's good that you have "Save time!", "Sell more!", and "Stay in control!" as headings, but the copy below that is so copious that I don't feel like reading any of it. Maybe boil each section down to a short sentence.

I also wonder if it might be better to pick just one of "save time" or "sell more". Read this: http://copyhackers.com/2012/10/save-time-and-money-is-lazy-ass-messaging/

If you look at Bidsketch, which I understand to be somewhat similar to your product, they seem to have picked saving time: http://www.bidsketch.com/home/

I have more thoughts but my son just woke up so I have to go. :)
Jason Swett Send private email
Thursday, March 14, 2013
 
 
"the copy below that is so copious"

OMG are you serious?  What is it with some people in these forums?  I had the same "problem" when I launched -- apparently too much text.  The text on Quotty is hardly anything!  I feel for you, Franco, because some people aren't going to be happy until your site has only 3 words on it.
Harry Phace Send private email
Thursday, March 14, 2013
 
 
For future reference, here's one of the "copious" blocks of text:

"Still breaking a sweat to prepare business quotations and proposals? Create your offers in minutes on the Web. Send them to buyer with just a mouse click!"

OMG.
Harry Phace Send private email
Thursday, March 14, 2013
 
 
Okay, I'm back. Again, on the features page, I would probably cut back on the copy. Maybe focus on the "save time" portion, and express your features in terms of the benefit the customer realizes, not necessarily the mechanics of how the feature works. (For example, instead of "this lawnmower has X horsepower", instead, "you'll never have a nicer-looking yard".)

I like your demo video, although you might want to consider having a voiceover instead of just music.

Your price page looks really good, although I did expect each plan to be clickable but they don't seem to be.

Your FAQ page looks well-done. Seems to do a good job overcoming objections.

Overall, I think you've done a good job with your site. Good luck!
Jason Swett Send private email
Thursday, March 14, 2013
 
 
Just saw Harry's reply. If you'd like to know where I'm coming from with the "too much copy" idea, check out Don't Make Me Think by Steve Krug. (It's a good web usability book in general.)
Jason Swett Send private email
Thursday, March 14, 2013
 
 
Googling it now to see.
Harry Phace Send private email
Thursday, March 14, 2013
 
 
"Still breaking a sweat to prepare business quotations and proposals?"

No, not really. Don't ask questions that you don't KNOW the answer to. People want info, not a quiz.

"Create your offers..." Are they business quotations and proposals or offers?

"...on the Web" I would have never guessed.

"Send them to buyer..." Who else would I send them to? "to buyer" is bad english.

"with just a mouse click!" I don't have a mouse.

Easily create and send business quotations and proposals in just minutes.

You use "&" and "and", pick one.

"Differentiate giving to buyer a vivid experience" Maybe: Interactive Experience

"when and what they looked at?" Why is this a question?

That's just the front page.
Mike Dixon Send private email
Thursday, March 14, 2013
 
 
@Harry

At first, I agreed with you--how could that little amount of text under each header be too copious?  But, as I looked at it more and thought about it more, despite my not wanting to admit it, I think he is probably right.

The problem is that when you take the whole set of words and their typography, color contrast, placement, and content as one gestalt, one whole thing, I *can* see it sending an [AVOID!  GO AWAY!] signal to the brains of potential customers.  It's not that there are too many words, per se, but that one's brain has to re-set three times for three different text areas, each with a different "point" to make, and then there multiple sub-points underneath each header, and they are in fact not even consistent in how they lay-out the information:  one of them has a few short "paragraphs" and the next two have a set of bullet points.  The text itself, then has multiple features to slow down the readability, too:  all the headers are shouting with exclamation points, it has one term in bold, a colon, questions, mixes basic language with more obscure language like "offer portfolio", "One-touch "Talk with us". etc.  And there are some grammatical issues, too.

And the text is in this not-very-readable font, with Halloween colors.

You throw all of this in a hopper and hit blend, and some alarming percentage of potential customers, in the midst of 500 emails, a long day, going on five hours sleep, are going to just move on. 

Instead, imagine if the entire text was one paragraph, in the most readable 18 point font, black text on a crisp white background, and said:

"Quotty allows you to create compelling business proposals quickly and easily, stores everything in an online portfolio, and offers tools to see just what your clients are paying attention to."
Racky Send private email
Thursday, March 14, 2013
 
 
FYI, the very first thing I read had an in-your-face ESL error: 'Exploit Web technology to improve image'. Missing 'your', probably.

I used to do RFP's and such; the kind I did would take weeks of work and be for big dollars. All the work was in parsing the requirements and thinking how best to word all the things we couldn't do.

I have my doubts that your service would be more effective than a traditional word processor, but maybe it would be useful for industries where you have to generate large number of quotations quickly, like house painters or something?
GregT Send private email
Thursday, March 14, 2013
 
 
Many thanks to everybody!

As Jason & Harry point, there is definitively too much text and readability is poor. Worse: to fit all text on three columns I decided to sacrifice text by cutting out prepositions and the text is still poorly readable.

Thus I was unable to transmit, the key difference between a word processor and Quotty: instead of sending the document, Quotty sends a link to a dynamic web page.

This results in feedback (you know what buyers are looking and how long =  interest) and Interactivity (accept with a click, ask questions …) that a static (PDF) document can't provide (plus making difficult to prospect to hand your offer to a competitor).

Racky's suggestion is very good: a single paragraph in large font with benefits only is surely more compelling. I am working in it.

And yes, Greg, I intentionally cut out “your” (as implied) to fit the text, but I now perceive that was a mistake.

All suggestions have been very useful. Thanks again for your consideration.
Franco Graziosi Send private email
Thursday, March 14, 2013
 
 
"one's brain has to re-set three times for three different text areas, each with a different "point" to make, and then there multiple sub-points underneath each header, and they are in fact not even consistent in how they lay-out the information:  one of them has a few short "paragraphs" and the next two have a set of bullet points. "

You guys think too much about nothing.  It's not an issue to the layman, believe me.  You're so desperate for sales that you're cropping everything down to nothing, which means a lot of people won't immediately see the answers they want and may move on instead of investigating.  IMO.
Harry Phace Send private email
Thursday, March 14, 2013
 
 
"You guys think too much about nothing.  It's not an issue to the layman, believe me.  You're so desperate for sales that you're cropping everything down to nothing, which means a lot of people won't immediately see the answers they want and may move on instead of investigating.  IMO. "

The thing is, we don't have to rely on your opinion:  the eye-tracking (and related) studies are out there.  I'm not saying I'm up on them, and so perhaps my take on this is wrong.  I would bet a half a tuna sandwich that I'm right about it, though.  In my job and life I've noticed often how easily people's eyes blear over when they meet all but the most easily processed content, and how little resistance they have to things that "make them think" in the bad way that _Don't Make Me Think_ means.

Let's somebody pipe up with the studies, folks, c'mon.
Racky Send private email
Thursday, March 14, 2013
 
 
http://www.google.com/search?q=long+copy+vs+short+copy
Executive summary:
Once your web page has a visitor, the longer he or she stays on that page, the better it is for your business.  So put lots of interesting copy on your landing page.  It's that easy.

As for the original topic:
Your Features and FAQ pages are hard to read. Not because they are too long, but because the typeface and size make it hard to read.  Your features page could use better organization and a layout that flows logically instead of just indistinguishable  bullet points.  Put your features in paragraph form and group them by putting like items in boxes.

Would I use it?  I can see value in putting large RFQ or tender/bid projects online, emailing documents back and forth is a nightmare once you have more than one buyer or vendor involved.  But I would want something that looked like it was developed by accountants and lawyers, not my twenty-something nephew.

Easy to use is not a feature I'm interested in, I want something that looks professional and keeps my accountants and lawyers happy.  I want something that makes the vendors and purchasing agents I deal with think we spent $20 million dollars developing this for ourselves and intimidates them.
Howard Ness Send private email
Thursday, March 14, 2013
 
 
Sorry to be negative, but I found the site to be too plain, with poor choices of typography, colours and layout. It also looks very weird on my monitor (27-inch 1920x1200), with scroll bars where they shouldn't be and very jarring highlight effects (pricing page). Also, the headings (pseudo-tabs/menu) jump around depending which page you click on.

It would be much better to start with something like Bootstrap and build from there. Or, pay $50 for a nice template and use that.

As always, IMHO, YMMV, etc.
Scorpio Send private email
Friday, March 15, 2013
 
 
I recommend having a look at the CopyHackers guides to copy writing - they sometimes do special offers on Appsumo and the like.  (I don't have any connection with them, just a satisfied customer!)

I learned a lot from them and more importantly saw results from following a few of their suggestions. 

I tend to be long winded (can you guess ;) and have far too much text on my websites, but cutting down on unneccesary text and focussing on the key features can really help your conversion rate. 

On the Features page you should have the most important features at the top of the list - I'm sure "Rich Media Content" and "PDF Generation" aren't the main reasons to buy your service? 

A tip the copyhacker book gave was to put the 4th or 5th most important feature at the bottom of the list, as people tend to read the first 3 or 4 features and skip down to the bottom - if the bottom one is a strong feature then it makes it look like a very strong proposition. 

If I were a potential customer one of my concerns may be - what if I become dependant on using your site to produce estimates but it's always down?  It would be worth addressing this if you can with what steps you are taking to ensure up-time - maybe quote figures, type of network infrastructure, etc etc?
John W King Send private email
Friday, April 05, 2013
 
 

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