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Moderators:

Andy Brice
Successful Software

Doug Nebeker ("Doug")

Jonathan Matthews
Creator of DeepTrawl, CloudTrawl, and LeapDoc

Nicholas Hebb
BreezeTree Software

Bob Walsh
host, Startup Success Podcast author of The Web Startup Success Guide and Micro-ISV: From Vision To Reality

Patrick McKenzie
Bingo Card Creator

Windows 8 app store

It looks like the rumours about an app store in Windows 8 are no longer rumours:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-14908568

Personally, I am finding it hard to summon any enthusiasm.

Has anyone seen any details on what the new Windows app store is going to be like? Are they going to take 30%? Will they require that you remove your own licensing?

How many of you are intending to submit your products to the app store as soon as it opens?
Andy Brice Send private email
Wednesday, September 14, 2011
 
 
I actually quite like the idea of a JavaScript/HTML front end on an app, it could make cross platform stuff a bit easier.

I'm pretty skeptical about the store though, I guess it depends how in your face it is in Windows. It might be hard to ignore.
Tony Edgecombe Send private email
Wednesday, September 14, 2011
 
 
@Andy, In the Keynote, they clearly said that they will not only get "Metro Style Apps", but also 32 bit/64 bit apps that we have currently.

Also developers have the option to enable "Get it from your site" option, so we don't have to pay 30% royalty to Microsoft :). Under this mode, they will essentially be doing a "Free listing service". This can be potentially game changer.

Check the Keynotes at  : http://www.buildwindows.com/
PM-SilverCrux Send private email
Wednesday, September 14, 2011
 
 
>Also developers have the option to enable "Get it from your site" option, so we don't have to pay 30% royalty to Microsoft :)

I like the sound of that!
Andy Brice Send private email
Wednesday, September 14, 2011
 
 
I'm a Mac developer and after watching the Windows 8 keynote (mainly the app store part) I must confess that developing for Win8 looks very tempting now.

Compared to Apple's app store developer experience MS' version offers you a lot of freedoms. Alone that you can offer free trials through their store + user your own licensing scheme  is a killer feature to me. Their 0% cut is just the icing on the cake.

Regarding the huge install base of Windows (and I guess Win8 install base will outdo the OS X install base rather quickly) it's really really tempting to write some Windows apps.

And if their (C++) WinRt APIs are somewhat sane developing for Win8 should be a no brainer for me.

Seeing this Apple has a lot to improve on the developer side of their app cage^H^H^Hstore.
Leon_ Send private email
Wednesday, September 14, 2011
 
 
I thought the decision not to offer free trials in the Mac app store was quite sensible, if someone is only paying a few dollars then you don't want to dilute the sales further by letting them try first.
Tony Edgecombe Send private email
Wednesday, September 14, 2011
 
 
I like the idea of the app store, and I like what I see on the UI, but I don't develop apps in HTML/JS/CSS. Will desktop apps continue to be first-class citizens? I've been planning a big push to get as many of my apps onto Windows as possible (and new ones as well) but not via a web-app-on-the-desktop approach.
Kevin_W. Send private email
Wednesday, September 14, 2011
 
 
Kevin,

I'm playing with the developer preview right now and as far as I can see you can create Metro apps JS/HTML, C#, VB.net and C++. (Though the C++ templates seem to use managed code - I'm trying to find out if you can use pure native C++ to write Metro apps).

Old school desktop apps won't become 2nd class citizens. MS will put them onto the app store too.  (At least that's what they said during the keynote).
Leon_ Send private email
Wednesday, September 14, 2011
 
 
I interpreted the keynote top say that old style win32 applications would be listed in the app store but downloaded from the publisher's site.

I liked the baked in trial licensing.
Oh to be anon again! Send private email
Wednesday, September 14, 2011
 
 
I see another brand new MS "technology" and excitement among developers. ;)
Mike Kinny Send private email
Wednesday, September 14, 2011
 
 
I don't think this is anything new technology wise. Today if you go to chrome store, you will find apps that are built using html + javascript and some of them are just a bookmark while some provide your google account integration to their web app and some just get installed in your computer. The installed ones need to be just html+javascript zip package.

I recenlty finished migrating mysql database objects into localstorage and now it is a standalone desktop app that runs in the browser. I personally think the concept is powerful but not sure if the end user will be willing to accept it.
nj Send private email
Wednesday, September 14, 2011
 
 
Now that we will have a new mobile app frontier, what are the formulaic approaches to making money there?
Josh Pearce (Make Cupcake Wrappers) Send private email
Wednesday, September 14, 2011
 
 
^ Make a good product that people want.
Nick Moore Send private email
Wednesday, September 14, 2011
 
 
@Tony

I see that as a chicken & egg thing. If people could try they'd probably be willing to pay a higher price for some things. It's clever for apple though, making a race to the bottom in app. pricing makes their hardware seem more appealing.
Jonathan Matthews Send private email
Wednesday, September 14, 2011
 
 
@ Leon

Studio 2011 c++ includes new keywords to work with an updated COM model in WinRT.  However code is compiled to native instructions.  From the docs :

If you are familiar with C++/CLI, you will notice that the Component Extensions look very similar to C++/CLI syntax. However, in a Metro style app or Windows Runtime component, all the C++ code is native. The /Zw compiler option causes the Component Extensions to be compiled for Windows Runtime. The /cli compiler option causes them to be compiled for C++/CLI. Currently, C++/CLI is not supported for Metro style apps
André Paradis Send private email
Wednesday, September 14, 2011
 
 
Thanks André,

the ^ did confuse me. Long time since I developed for Windows - and I remembered the ^ from managed C++.
Leon_ Send private email
Wednesday, September 14, 2011
 
 
Oh god... They're bringing ^ back. NOOOOOOOooooo.... Splat.

I thought Managed C++ was dead.
Bring back anon Send private email
Wednesday, September 14, 2011
 
 
Jonathan Matthews: "I see that as a chicken & egg thing. If people could try they'd probably be willing to pay a higher price for some things. It's clever for apple though, making a race to the bottom in app. pricing makes their hardware seem more appealing."

It commoditises software.  Hardware companies want to commoditise software.  Software companies want to commoditise hardware.

Sincerely,

Gene Wirchenko
Gene Wirchenko Send private email
Wednesday, September 14, 2011
 
 
One thing I haven't seen in all the press is the projected release date for Windows 8. Has Microsoft announced it?
Nicholas Hebb Send private email
Thursday, September 15, 2011
 
 
>One thing I haven't seen in all the press is the projected release date for Windows 8. Has Microsoft announced it?

Would we believe it, if they did? ;0)
Andy Brice Send private email
Thursday, September 15, 2011
 
 
Your a funny guy Andy!
SEO Plan Send private email
Thursday, September 15, 2011
 
 
> Would we believe it, if they did? ;0)

No, but we could double the months out and get an estimate. ;)
Nicholas Hebb Send private email
Friday, September 16, 2011
 
 

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