* The Business of Software

A former community discussing the business of software, from the smallest shareware operation to Microsoft. A part of Joel on Software.

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Andy Brice
Successful Software

Doug Nebeker ("Doug")

Jonathan Matthews
Creator of DeepTrawl, CloudTrawl, and LeapDoc

Nicholas Hebb
BreezeTree Software

Bob Walsh
host, Startup Success Podcast author of The Web Startup Success Guide and Micro-ISV: From Vision To Reality

Patrick McKenzie
Bingo Card Creator

Can you please give b2b misv examples?

Hello all
im trying to get into the misv world and right not im doing ( with my self mostly )
brainstorming on which direction to start b2c or b2b reading this wonderful forum and people here
its clear that the money is in the b2b applications . can you please tell me about b2b application examples?
Thanks
m.y Send private email
Tuesday, May 26, 2009
 
 
>its clear that the money is in the b2b applications

That is the conventional wisdom. But it wasn't supported by this survey:
http://successfulsoftware.net/2007/09/19/business-of-software-microisv-survey/
I don't know how representative this data is though.
Andy Brice Send private email
Tuesday, May 26, 2009
 
 
Money is not nececeraly in b2b clients.

I sell flash video chat software for websites and my clients include mostly individuals who own websites but companies who own websites and web dev companies who develop sites for others. 

If I am not mistaken Balsamiq.com was planning on selling their prodict (balsamiq mockups) to companies using expensive project/bug management systems like JIRA but now they are doing most of theirs sales from the standalone/desktop version of their software which is much more consumer oriented.

Also Joel has a nice post that might be of  interest to you. It talks about why there is no  software priced between $1000 and $60.000. Because the cost of selling to large companies expensive software its so high you'll need to charge $60.000 to cover it! I'll need to find it and link it here!
Naicu Octavian Send private email
Tuesday, May 26, 2009
 
 
Here is a sample listing of software companies that probably one man businesses. It has B2B, mostly B2C.

http://www.asp-shareware.org/membership/Member-listing.asp
Hiding from my customers Send private email
Tuesday, May 26, 2009
 
 
Naicu Octavian was talking about this post: http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/CamelsandRubberDuckies.html

I also think this discussion from last year is quite relevant:
http://discuss.joelonsoftware.com/default.asp?biz.5.646202.56

I also think that there is too much sample bias in survey that Andy Brice keeps referring to to draw any meaningful conclusions.
Andrew Austin Send private email
Tuesday, May 26, 2009
 
 
"can you please tell me about b2b application examples? "

It's any software used by businesses (or sometimes institutions and governments is included) -- generic payroll, invoicing, accounting, point-of-sale, order tracking, customer support systems, corporate IT applications, parts tracking and ordering, vendor list management, assembled product tracking and labeling, warehousing, shipping and receiving, fleet management, etc. And typically it's niche specific, like aircraft rental fleet management software versus rental car fleet management software, if not outright customer-specific especially for business-critical applications.
CC Send private email
Tuesday, May 26, 2009
 
 
I think you should concentrate on solving pain points for people.  They will sort themselves into business vs personal purchases if they find your product useful.  You'll never really know because some people will purchase using their own money, to use at their work, and others will use their business to purchase something to use at home, for tax reasons.

An example might be a photo editing app.  You might think that it is a consumer product, but maybe it hits a chord with professional house photographers and starts selling.  Is it B2b or B2c in that case?  Doesn't matter - you've got customers, that's all that matters.  Same goes for Dev tools : one might be taken up in large licences by large corps, another might appeal to home hobbyists.  As long as it appeals to someone, you can classify the market after sales start.

By all means look at different products in different industries in your brainstorming, but in the end you need to make your decision on if your product solves a problem for people, not what segment the customer is from.
Bruce Chapman Send private email
Tuesday, May 26, 2009
 
 
>I also think that there is too much sample bias in survey that Andy Brice keeps referring to to draw any meaningful conclusions.

I think it has been quite some time since I referred to Neil Davidson's survey results. Are you sure you aren't confusing it with a download rate survey I did more recently?

Sample bias, small sample sizes and the impossibility of verifying the accuracy are issues for both surveys. But it is better than no data.
Andy Brice Send private email
Wednesday, May 27, 2009
 
 
One outstanding example of b2b misv is Ian landsman with Helpspot (http://www.userscape.com).
This is a real business system designed an maintained by a single person. Awesome.
I humbly hope to get the same results with mine.
Stray__Cat Send private email
Wednesday, May 27, 2009
 
 

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