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Successful Software

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BreezeTree Software

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Patrick McKenzie
Bingo Card Creator

Good books/articles about SEM/SEO

Hi guys,

I am looking for good books or articles about SEM/SEO. Which ones would you recommend? I am a beginner. Where is a good place to start?

Thank you in advance
The apprentice
Thursday, January 10, 2008
 
 
http://www.seobook.com/

nuff said.

No, seriously, it's an awesome resource. The firefox extension is interesting too.
Tim Haughton Send private email
Thursday, January 10, 2008
 
 
Jon Chase Send private email
Thursday, January 10, 2008
 
 
@ Tim , Jon
That seobook is last updated 3-4 years ago,many things changed in the world since
no name
Thursday, January 10, 2008
 
 
The demo version of iBusinessPromoter includes a comprehensive up-to-date starter eBook on search engine optimization (PDF).

http://www.ibusinesspromoter.com
iBusinessPromoter Send private email
Thursday, January 10, 2008
 
 
@no name
The SEO Book, which I purchased a week ago, was last updated on Tuesday, November 13, 2007.

If you register with the authors website you'll get unlimited updates to the book.

Regards -
Marcus not from Melbourne
Thursday, January 10, 2008
 
 
@ Marcus not from Melbourne
Can you explain why you decided to pay for such an book when internet is loaded with free SEO tips/tricks?
Is that book really so good and worth money?
atza
Thursday, January 10, 2008
 
 
I'm not Marcus, but I'd say that it comes down to how much you value your time.  There's a lot of useful SEO stuff on the web, but you have to sort through an awful lot of junk to find it.

And, since SEO involves a lot of guesswork, half of what's out there is contradictory to the rest, so there's certainly an appeal to starting one's SEO learning with information from just one source.
MB Send private email
Thursday, January 10, 2008
 
 
PS  I'd also recommend signing up for Ed Dale's thirty day challenge:

http://www.thirtydaychallenge.com/
MB Send private email
Thursday, January 10, 2008
 
 
Hi Bata,

I suppose you're right. I could spend the time to scour the Internet, parse and filter through the rubbish, and arrive at the same conclusions the book has.

The book was (if I recall) $79 USD. Let's pretend I value my time at $79 per hour. Could I gleam the same level and depth of knowledge from the Internet (again filtering out the rubbish) in one hour as a dedicated book on the subject written by someone who has far more experience in the domain than I?

You're at a forum for people who either have or want to develop their own software business. I assume you fall in to the same category.

Do you have or are you developing software really so good and worth money? Why would people pay you for your services or software? The same question can be applied to almost any industry or endeavour.

Figure it this way - if I learn something that prevents me from making a mistake (from trial and error) that would have cost me $79, I will - as a minimum - break even.

Regards -

Marcus from London
formerly Marcus from Melbourne
Thursday, January 10, 2008
 
 
My apologies atza for misspelling your name.
(The spell checker picked it up without my realising)
Marcus from London
Thursday, January 10, 2008
 
 
Welcome to the UK, Marcus!
MB Send private email
Thursday, January 10, 2008
 
 
Let me give an SEOBook vs "internet resources" example...

Many SEO articles recommend submitting to directories. Aaron Wall of SEOBook, and a few others I respect, no longer recommend that route. Google just doesn't give much weight to those links any more.

First hand, I submitted to a bunch of them and saw no change in my SERP's. I even became a DMOZ Editor and got my site listed. It didn't amount to anything traffic, SERP, or PR-wise (a measure that is overemphasized in many SEO articles).

Had I read SEOBook first, I would have saved myself a lot of time and money.
Nick Hebb Send private email
Thursday, January 10, 2008
 
 
Thanks for the welcome MB. It's great to be here. London is an adventure I've been working towards for a while.

Meanwhile in Melbourne (Aust) today it will hit 40 (Celsius).  London weather isn't so bad(seriously).
Marcus from London
Thursday, January 10, 2008
 
 
Wow, 40 Celsius sounds amazing :)  I'm based in Swansea where the weather is generally mild and drizzly...  And, unlike London, there's slim to zero chance of a decent job in IT unless you set up a MicroISV.  But it does at least have nice beaches. 

London's a great city, and many many people seem to migrate there (most of my friends at any rate).  I hope you enjoy it!

Apologies to everyone but Marcus for going so off topic.  To redeem myself let me say that Nick makes an excellent point above.  One problem with searching for SEO advice online is that so much of it is out of date.  The search engines often favour older content, so that means, when you search for something like [submitting to directories] you'll find a load of SEO advice that went out of date some time ago.

And, to make things more confusing, in my experience, a lot of such content isn't clearly dated at all (I'm guessing clever SEOs know that an an out-of-date date is a quick way to put a limit on your potential backlinks).
MB Send private email
Thursday, January 10, 2008
 
 
There are also a lot of people who, candidly, don't know what they're talking about.  I want to weep every other time I see a comment thread about SEO.
Patrick McKenzie (Bingo Card Creator) Send private email
Thursday, January 10, 2008
 
 
There's been some good advice on here, but, I don't have time to read a book, I'd prefer to offload this to someone.  Ideally, they would optimise my site and also manage my adword campaign (I'm in set and forget mode). 

I'm sure many would advise against this, but I enjoy programming too much :-) and I'm getting decent sales even though people appear to find it extremely difficult to find my site.  Only marginally raising the profile of my site and  adwords would yield a significant increase in sales IMO.

Can anyone recommend someone?

Thanks
Orson Kart Send private email
Friday, January 11, 2008
 
 
PS. I tried sharewarepromotions, but they are fully booked up for the foreseeable future.
Orson Kart Send private email
Friday, January 11, 2008
 
 
Orson, my thoughts on offloading SEO are that, unless you are in a real money-spinner market, you'd have to be pretty lucky to find someone good that can get you lots of sustained traffic *and* a good ROI.

There are lots of monkeys out there that will get you a bunch of spammy links for a monthly fee, but my understanding is that it costs a lot of money to hire someone who knows what they're doing.  There aren't any lasting quick fixes to getting good organic rankings: however good you are at SEO, it takes a lot of time, and a very good understanding of your market.  Consequently real SEO services are unavoidably expensive.

After all, what SEO worth their salt is going to want to offer their services instead of building their own money-making web properties to give them *recurring* income?

Seriously, with a fairly dedicated effort at learning and implementing SEO, I'm starting to rank for key search phrases above corporations with much deeper pockets.  I smile every time I see a competitor get a bunch of new spammy links - they've clearly signed up with some $100-a-month jackass SEO, and are hopefully on a fast path to getting spammed out of the SERPs by Google.  Don't make the same mistake that they have!  Or, if you definitely do want to outsource, be very very careful.
MB Send private email
Friday, January 11, 2008
 
 
Just to clarify - my comments above relate to outsourcing to an SEO to get higher SERPS and more organic traffic.  Outsourcing PPC might work fine, I don't know about that!
MB Send private email
Friday, January 11, 2008
 
 
Thanks for that MB.  I'm in a niche B2B market with little competition.  People are searching for my product and just cannot find it, I've lost count of the number of people who say they have been searching on google for weeks and then all of a sudden up popped my site.

I guess I'll get round to it myself one day, after doing the dev, support, accounts, VAT etc :-)
Orson Kart Send private email
Friday, January 11, 2008
 
 
Wow, it sounds like you might have a heck of a lot to gain from SEO, and it might not be too difficult either:

1.  Find out what exactly these people are searching for.
2.  Optimize your site for those keyphrases, and build some links links.

If there's not much competition for those keyphrases, you might be able to start ranking in the organic SERPs quite quickly.

Though I'm a bit confused as to why they're not finding you via AdWords already?  Or maybe you haven't figured out the phrases they're searching for yet?
MB Send private email
Friday, January 11, 2008
 
 
I haven't spent much time on it to be honest. My site is poor  for SEO - I know that without asking, and I created an adwords campaign a couple of years ago and haven't really tweaked the settings much at all.

An additional reason they may not be able to find me is because the market I sell into is very competitive.  Say I sell 'submarine washing software', my site and adwords tend to get pushed down the rankings by all the 'submarine washing' companies pushing adwords and SEO to the max.
Orson Kart Send private email
Friday, January 11, 2008
 
 
Ah I see.  So few competitors for "submarine washing software", but lots for "submarine washing".  Sounds not so dissimilar to my market, submarine polishing - I got to the top of the SERPS for "submarine polishing software" very easily, and, after lots of SEO effort, I'm just starting to get somewhere with the much-more-competitive "submarine polishing".

Annoyingly I'm finding that a lot of the "submarine polishing" traffic is actually looking for a completely different type of polishing to the polishing that my target market wants.
MB Send private email
Friday, January 11, 2008
 
 
@Orson

I find that Patrick McKenzie's blog a good source to find out some tips on getting your site ranking improved.  You do have to spend time on it, but Patrick has some great articles talking about what he did, and how he improved sales and traffic.

If you are getting sales already, I think you can probably significantly increase sales by getting more targeted traffic.  And if people are not finding you, that's potential lost sales.
Eric D. Burdo Send private email
Friday, January 11, 2008
 
 
+ for Patrick's blog. I think Andy has a lot of very good information (but I forget if he has a blog).

Andy and Patrick, how'bout posting links to your blogs?

Also, check out :
http://www.seomoz.org/

I've looked at them a little and saw good info. A friend who studies this recommended them.
Mr. Analogy Send private email
Friday, January 11, 2008
 
 
Also, just for my own curiosity:

For those considering "outsourcing" thier SEO, I'd be curious to know:

Do you want full service or just specific recommendations?
(e.g., someone who will edit your site to improve it, or just a list of improvements like "put ABC XYZ as your ALT text tag in the first image)

Do you already know what keywords you should target?
Mr. Analogy Send private email
Friday, January 11, 2008
 
 
>>
You do have to spend time on it, but Patrick has some great articles talking about what he did, and how he improved sales and traffic.
>>

http://microisvjournal.wordpress.com/category/seo/ has *most* of my more substantial SEO posts.  The others, particularly towards the beginning, are sort of stuck in bits and pieces.
Patrick McKenzie (Bingo Card Creator) Send private email
Friday, January 11, 2008
 
 
Incidentally, a +1 for SEOMoz, who have a combination of technical chops and the sort of attitude I like to see in a business, and a +1 for SEOBook, who host both technical chops and attitude. ;)  They're links #1 and #2 in my feedreader on SEO.  Both are also really, really good for beginners.
Patrick McKenzie (Bingo Card Creator) Send private email
Friday, January 11, 2008
 
 

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